Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Cargo Trailer Conversion?

After some looking we both realized a conventional travel trailer will not suit our needs. The main constraints are total weight (to tow) and cost. We have limited towing capacity and a realistic but limited budget. There are cheap and decent trailers or cheap and light trailers but there are not cheap, decent and light trailers. In looking at different options we came to a mutual conclusion. To do a cargo trailer conversion.

James Yeagers bug out trailer is something I have been thinking about a lot.

That being said my plan will differ from James Yeagers because I have a smaller vehicle that can haul less weight and probably a lot tighter budget.   Also significantly Wifey agreed in principle to this project, which is a serious conciliation to team paranoia (me), under the condition that we set it up so it looks decent. This means painting the walls, laying down some flooring, etc.

Basically the concept is as follows:
Purchase a smallish enclosed cargo trailer, probably a 6x10.
Maybe add insulation, paint the walls and put in some linoleum or something.
Add some shelving and at least one bed.
Put on some sort of an awning under which we could put out some chairs and cook, etc even if it was raining.
Our intent (Wifeys idea actually) is to have it set up so we could conceivably go camping on a moments notice. So that means having clothes, cook ware, dishes, bedding, hygiene stuff, etc that is distinct from our normal household stuff all pre positioned ready to go.
I would like (though funds do not currently exist to do so) to add a decent solar setup and a battery bank. At least enough to run some basic 12 volt lights, change a thing or two and run a couple fans.

We do not plan to add a shower, bathroom or inside kitchen. Space is at a premium given that we can't haul a huge trailer, have 2 big dogs and 2 kids.

Anyway that is the plan as of now. We will see what develops.

Thoughts? Experiences?


Monday, March 23, 2015

Taxes and Trailer?

Got the taxes taken care of for the year. Since it isn't April we are doing better than usual. I am pleased to say we did better than expected which was nice. Things worked out just right to drop us into a lower tax bracket. Will have to look at if we can strategically make that happen for 2015 also.

With these unexpected gains we are looking at purchasing a trailer. Something enclosed either a cargo trailer or just maybe a small camper if we can find one light enough that is still in the budget. This would greatly aid in traveling and camping with 2 kids and 2 big dogs. It would also really be handy in a variety of preparedness type situations. More research will be done and we will talk more later. Exciting times.

Saturday, March 21, 2015

Firearm Selection Criteria: Concept of Use, Reliability, Commonality, Affordability, and Personal Preference

Today I want to talk about a methodology for selection of firearms and arguably other tools. I put these in order intentionally; the way I did it was working through the perspective of a person trying to decide on a type of weapon to purchase. It is also worth noting I am focusing on weapons for practical, predominantly defensive, use. For sporting weapons reliability is less important as the worst case is a ruined day of hunting or whatever your hobby is. Weapons purchased for enjoyment of shooting or collecting can fail to meet any of the criteria and still be your thing. If you like shooting black powder rifles or surplus Swiss Schmidd Rubens in 7.5x55 which is currently on sale for .51 cents a round at Lucky Gunner then roll with it, the act is it's own reward. So here we go.

The first category is concept of use. It took a lot of consideration to put this one first. The reason is that it is going to decide the general type of weapons you are going to be looking into.

I will explain in a brief tangent. A gun can be great but entirely wrong for what you want it to do. A Glock 22 is the pistol most likely to be in an LEO's holster in any town USA. A fishermen in Alaska might very well be packing a Ruger or S&W .44 mag. A normal guy down in Florida who wants a discrete summer CCW piece he doesn't need to dress around might be packing a tiny .380 like a Ruger LCP. Lets say they all rotate leaving the fishermen with the Glock 40, the cop with the Ruger LCP and the guy down in Florida with the big ole .44 mag. Obviously this is a big old ball of fail.

Think of it like walking into a big well stocked gun store. The fishermen would go to the racks of big bore revolvers, specifically the double action ones. The LEO would gravitate to the racks of semi automatic pistols specifically looking at the compact and full sized models. The guy from Florida would go look at the smaller semi automatic pistols and revolvers.

While you obviously need to look at the general type of weapons that fit your need I would urge against being TOO SPECIFIC. The reason for this is a tendency to create artificially specific requirements to lead you down a path to a gun you want and feel justified in getting whatever you want. One might say this is fine. I disagree for two reasons. First people do not look to justify a decision they inherently know is sound. They are looking to justify a decision because it is too expensive, entirely unneeded or has other various downsides. Second by putting these arbitrary specific criteria at the beginning of the selection process (vs at the end) they may come to a conclusion that has some fundamental problems.

The second category is reliability. Guns owned to save your life in an emergency need to be reliable. I'm not talking 'this gun is reliable if it has been cleaned the day before, is lubricated just so and has special ammunition made of unicorn horns and big foot bones' but under all manner of conditions.

Generally the easiest way to get this is to buy a firearm made to a professional standard. As such it might not be a bad idea to look at weapons used by the military (not just ours) and law enforcement. I don't want to get into any arguments but we're talking big, quality companies like Ruger, Glock, Smith and Wesson, Remington, Sig Sauer, H&K, etc. Avoid fly by night manufacturers and 'price point' brands. Of course even the lowest end Saturday Night Special manufacturer probably, if just by luck, managed to put out a couple guns that work really well. If you happen to have one of those then rock with it. That being said generally after one digs into the 'my Ghetto Blaster Pimptastic Model' works perfectly they find the gun is actually used very little. They haven't tested their guns enough for anything to happen.

Next comes commonality. Commonality of manufacturer, model and chambering. There are a lot of reasons for this. The biggest single one is that common manufacturers/ models and cartridges are common for a reason. Glock hasn't sold millions of 9mm Glock 17's  because it is a piece of junk. Winchester Model 94 30-30 stood the test of time and stayed in production for over a century because they were great rifles and people loved them.

Additionally commonality of a weapon tends to mean more accessories, holsters, custom parts, etc are available for that weapon. Pretty much every holster company makes every model for say a Glock 17 or Sig P226. You can't say that about a Broomhandled Mauser.


Commonality also goes a long way in showing you what sort of support there is for a firearm. Support in terms of spare parts should something break, continued availability of mags, etc all is largely dictated by a weapons commonality. It is a lot easier to find a spring or pin for an AR-15in 5.56 than for an FN-FAL in 280 British.


These are considerations for any firearm owner. A preparedness inclined person is going to weigh availability (which is linked to commonality) of mags and spare parts a whole lot higher than a normal shooter. In an ugly situation I would be able to find say a spare part for an AK-47 or a Glock 17 9mm in my community. It would be a big hassle and I would pay dearly for it, which is why I stock spare parts, but I could get it. On the other hand if the guns were a new boutique rifle  in 6.8 and a Makarov pistol there might not be spare parts within 500 miles which I would not be able to find them in an emergency or realistically get them. Commonality and the ability to trade/ cross level/ scavenge parts/ mags has been weighted heavily for me in recent years and has been a seriously limiting factor in my weapons choices.

Hate to be a buzz kill but affordability matters. We all have budgets and competing demands. I believe owning good modern weapons is important but we have to be realistic. If you are on a $500 Glock/ S&W M&P/ Springfield XD budget there isn't much point in looking at $950 stainless steel SIGs, let alone 3k custom 1911's.

Look beyond the cost of the gun. Consider the cost of mags, spare parts, ammo, etc all to equip the gun however you deem necessary. For example for a fighting pistol like my Glock 19 I like to have at least 10 mags and 1,000 rounds of ammo.  The cost difference figured this way between say my G19 and an H&K .45 is going to be significant.

Awhile back Commander Zero broke down exactly how long it would take to save enough money for a Glock and an AR-15 earning just minimum wage. A couple months of delivering Pizza's a few shifts a week after work would do it. Granted that would suck but if you really want some decent guns and money is tight it would be a way to do it.

Personal Preference comes last. We have already narrowed down the pool of potential options that fit our concept of use to reliable, fairly common models within our budget. Now we can look within those options and make personal preference decisions.
James Yeager talks personal preference. In short he thinks it is a bunch of crap. I agree with Mr. Yeagers general point that personal preference can be taken to extremes. In some circles it is an 'everyone is a unique and special snowflake' sort of thing. This is doubly true with inexperienced shooters. The truth is that your unique choice might in fact be stupid.

Where I disagree with Mr Yeager is that, within an intentionally selected pool of options I see no issue with people making choices based on personal preference. Maybe a person is in the market for a defensive shotgun and logically narrowed their choices down to the Mossberg 500 and Remington 870. Say that person is a lefty so they go for the Mossberg 500 whose controls are easier to handle. Say a perspective LEO was looking for a duty weapon and for the sake of this discussion he had free reign to carry any non single action compact or full sized 9mm, 40 S&W or .45 acp .That young man might handle all of those pistols and rent the three or four he liked best to shoot.

So to close out on personal preference I do believe personal preference has a valid role in firearm selection so long as it is within a pool of weapons that meet some logical pre determined criteria.

Anyway I hope this gives you a way to think about future purchases and hopefully save the hassle of buying the wrong gun(s).


Thoughts?



Friday, March 20, 2015

Pocket Pistol Ammo, The Arctic, GEN Petraeus on Iraq and Other Stuff

Meister linked to a cool new .380 round by Lehigh Defense. Up till now you have had two options for .380 ammo. JHP ammo, including some good stuff like 90 grain Speer Gold Dots that arguably fails to penetrate sufficiently for some tastes. The other option is .380 FMJ which penetrates but leaves a hole many consider less than impressive. Buffalo Bore makes a 100 grain semi jacketed lead flat nose which looks promising but it is a BB load so it's as heavy and fast as possible; as such it's probably better suited to a (relatively) larger and sturdier pistol like Walther PPK, Bersa or Glock 42 than the ultra small/ light pocket rockets.

This new Lehigh round penetrates like an FMJ with better temporary and permanent wound cavities.

It bears serious consideration. Once I've done a little more research and have some jingle in my pocket I'll probably buy a couple boxes.

This chart of Russia's Military presence in the Arctic is interesting. Looks like they are setting conditions to dominate a future resource grab up there. 

GEN (RET) Petraeus talks the Islamic State, Iraq and Iran. Considering he is the jedi master of COIN and (as much as any one person possibly could) our success, if only temporary, in Iraq can be attributed to him I listen when the man talks.

Larry Vickers breaking down the famous Collateral 'briefcase scene'. That has been one of my favorite movie gun fight scenes for awhile. Larry's breakdown of the scene is worth watching.

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Thoughts on Groups and Leadership



Leading people and being involved in groups are an interesting things. In no particular order I have some thoughts on the matter.

-Never order someone to do something you will not do yourself. Once my commander, a Major, cleaned up human feces with an e tool because he wouldn't order anyone else to do it.

-Following on the first point never give an order you do not think there is a good chance your people will follow. Either you seem out of touch or like a complete a hole for no reason, neither of which is good. Also when they inevitably fail to follow the order you knew they probably wouldn't follow the options are to punish them, which is stupid, or ignore, which makes you look weak are both bad.

-Delegation is an interesting thing. As a leader at almost any level you simply cannot personally do everything that must be done. That being said you can delegate authority but not responsibility. In plain language that means someone can act on your behalf to get something done but if they mess up it's still on you.

-My general belief on delegation is that people should focus on doing stuff they can do which others cannot. People should pass the things others can do onto those folks.

-Of course you need to figure out what people are capable of when handing out tasks. Even if they want to do the right thing (which they generally do) asking folks to do something they can't just doesn't work. If I was given the task to write a code for a computer or rebuild the engine on a vehicle I would almost surely fail, because those tasks are outside of my skill set. Furthermore leaders should, whenever possible, have people do things they are interested in. Even if it causes some shuffling of other things if you have folks do stuff they are interested in they will do better and everything goes well.

-The preparedness/ survivalism scene is full of people who want to be the leader but absent people who want to be led. Every yahoo wants to be the Chief but nobody wants to be an Indian.

-Leading people without a readily apparent extrinsic (money, etc all) motivator is a hassle. Honestly I don't envy 'leaders' in preparedness/ survivalism. Aside from the fact that they are herding cats, they have to figure out how to create intrinsic motivation in people to get them to do stuff. Leading a bunch of cats by consensus in an environment where you have no stock and an iffy carrot would suck.

-In a decent sized group peer pressure is a hell of a thing.

Monday, March 16, 2015

What Did You Do To Prepare This Week?

-Ordered a stripped AR-15 lower.

-Purchased a second mag for the Ruger LCP.

-Typed up our pantry inventory. I need to print it out and keep it on a clip board in the kitchen.

-Did some reading ham stuff.

-Cranking the miles out decently with some soreness but no joint issues. Am at 20 miles so far for the month and given that last month was 27 total that is good. My goal this month is between 35 and 40. I would like to progress over another month or two and end up in the 45-55 mile range. We'll see what happens.

-Reading Tales of the Stake Out Squad. Pretty interesting story about a unique time period.

What did you do to prepare this week?

Saturday, March 14, 2015

From Around The Web and Trimming Pack Weight

Fer FAL's 12 Survival Lessons from the Ukraine is definitely worth reading

T Blog did a post on trimming pack weight.I have a few thoughts on this. In no particular order.

-When it comes to weight it is important to talk apples and apples.

          -I weigh my ruck dry as in without water. Of course total weight including water (wet) matters but since water is rapidly consumed then replaced I find 'dry' a more meaningful number. 

         - We also have to get on the same page as to concept of use. Since the BOB/ level 3 sustainment load is pretty ambiguous the question of how amounts of consumables, specifically food, matters. Of course a bag set up to feed a person for 5 days is going to weigh more than one designed for 2 days.

-40 pounds coming up as the number some D Boys settled on is interesting. My BOB/ level 3 sustainment load comes in a shade under 40 pounds (dry, 37 if I recall) and if I recall John Mosby's is in the same general weight range.

-The snugpack is a pretty cool little setup. I would like one for my level 2.5 bag and since they are a shade under $60 it is an easy decision.


-Cutting weight on individual items is a good plan so long as it does not compromise capabilities you want/ need.  For example swapping a 5" full tang knife for a smaller 3", lighter full tang knife would save weight with negligible capability loss. On the other hand going to a Mora would mean the fixed blade knife would have few capabilities beyond my EDC benchmade.

-Weight of food is notable. Also specifically for the little Tactical Tailor bag I bought bulk matters. I am looking at revisiting my food plan for this bag with some protein bars that are calorie dense and some freeze dried stuff for actual meals.

-My level 2.5 bag is sitting at 17 pound dry. I would like to get it into the 13-15 pound range. Will do some more shaving and then post a contents list.

-Oleg Volk did an interesting post on pistol caliber carbines. The 5.56 pistol is discussed.


Friday, March 13, 2015

Tiny .380 Concept of Use

As you may know I recently bought a Ruger LCP custom. Our friend Meister talked about the LCP as a handy little carry piece. I have been thinking about this and it bears some discussion.

-A little .380 like the Ruger LCP/ Kel Tech P3AT/ S&W Bodyguard has a couple of apparent uses. The first is as a deep concealment piece. The kind of little pistol you can carry pretty much anywhere has a pretty solid role in any battery. Secondly they are an obvious choice as a back up gun.

-These guns fill a valid role. I owned a Kahr but ended up selling it because it didn't bring a unique capability to the table. 

-A couple of buddies have a two pistol combo of a full sized handgun and a little .380. They respectively own a Springfield TRP 1911/ Kel Tech P3AT and a Springfield XD and Kahr P380. This combo has a lot of merit. A full sized house/ SHTF gun and a nice little carry piece cover both ends of the spectrum.

-As to carrying a little .380 there are certainly some compromises to be made. They are handy as can be and can slip into any pocket. Obviously they are of a rather small caliber, not especially easy to shoot and don't carry a bunch of rounds.

-One must do their own risk analysis and cost to benefit on whether carrying such a small pistol is for them. I can't make choices for anybody else.  Personally I live in a very safe little community. My odds of facing a robber coming out of the grocery store with a gallon of milk for the kiddo's at 7pm are infinitesimal. As such the convenience of slipping a handy little pistol to slip in my pocket is useful with minimal risk.

I am comfortable with the LCP in my pocket in this sleepy little town. Now if I was visiting my sister in Houston I would be carrying the LCP, as a back up to my Glock 19.

-Ammo is an interesting discussion. Meister and the smart guy from box of truth both recommend FMJ since no JHP ammo is capable of sufficient penetration to meet the FBI standards. I am currently packing some 90 grain Hornady JHP ammo that I got a box of at the gun store but I have to do some more research on the matter.  I like the .380 Speer gold dots as well as generally liking Gold Dots in pretty much every caliber.

I think between the Ruger LCP and Glock 19 most of my pistol needs are met. 

Got pocket pistol?

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Quote of the Day and Small Town Life

"Do you wanna hold the shotgun or get the shovel?" Me to Wifey.

"I'll hold the shotgun."- Wifey

Background. At approximately 2200 the dogs started freaking out. Dogs went outside and kept freaking out so I went and got the shotgun. Shined a light outside and the big dogs were fighting over something. Was it a stuffed animal? They drag them into the yard sometimes. I go to take a closer look. It was a dead possum. Wifey asks "What do we do with it?"

That brought up the quote.

1 possum dead and all my chickens alive, will call that a good day. New dog might be staying around after all.

Also I feel pretty good about our home security status if the dogs lose their shit that much about an overgrown rat I don't like a persons odds of sneaking up undetected at all.

Monday, March 9, 2015

My Go To 3 Guns For The Walking Dead

Want to do something fun today. The Walking Dead is back on. They are in the almost boringly predictable scenario of a safe situation that is just a little too good to be true with hints of how it could go bad. Also Rick shaved his beard and has taken a practical, if not very humanistic, stance on looking after his group or just maybe is losing his shit. Time will tell. Anyway I've been thinking about what my top 3 guns for the Zombie Apocalypse a la Walking Dead would be.

Rifle
AK-47 with fixed wood stock. Don't especially care what model though a good one would be nice and a chrome lined barrel would be good too. I do not want to get deep into the AK vs AR discussion. They both have a lot to offer and some marginal up sides over each other. The things that really put the AK above the AR, for this very specific scenario, is that it's capacity to use as a bludgeon to kill those darn Zombies is much better than the AR. Yes you  can butt stroke someone with an AR but you could bash in Walker skulls all day long with an AK with a fixed wood stock! Also they are more durable and physically rugged than AR's, if by a small margin, and close to comparable in terms of the amount of mags n ammo floating around to scavenge.

Pistol
Glock 19/17 with threaded barrel and silencer. Mod's don't really matter but if I had the options it would have supressor sized  night sights, a stainless steel guide rod and a 3.5lb trigger connector. I would choose the Glock because they are super durable and probably the most common caliber/ platform out there.

Other
Bolt action rifle with iron sights and a good scope in a flat shooting caliber. Due to commonality .308 would probably be the way I would go and one of the new Savage rifles like their Hog Hunter or Scout would be great but any old common bolt gun in .308/ '06 is just fine too. The goal of this would be reaching out and touching someone at 200+ yards with a fair element of precision.

The caveat to this is if I was able to really use one a bow (non compound variety) that would be a great option. One of those plain fiberglass 40ish pound recurve bows you see at garage sales all the time.

Knife
Busse TGLB sage with tan micarta grips. All the coolness of Daryl Dixon but with an easier to maintain finish

What are your walking dead guns?

Saturday, March 7, 2015

2016 Election Shortage Starting Early?

The whole M855 thing came up then it started a general run on affordable bulk 5.56 ammo like PMC MTAC M193 55gr ammo at$80/200 . T Blog noted there may be a shortage on. So far it is just 5.56 ammo but it might just spread. This brings up the almost inevitable 2016 election hysteria that is coming at some point or another. Which got me to thinking about exactly what I want to acquire in the next few months before the semi scheduled madness occurs.

What's on my list? In no particular order of priority:
-An AR-15 stripped lower just in case. As of late I've seen a trend of slightly used, or sometimes unfired upper's at fire sale prices on the local market. Lots of guys here seem to want to build an AR and don't quite get it done, flip uppers to build a new project or just plain need money. Having a lower to complete one of those would be nice.
-At least 2 more mags for the LCP.
-Some sort of way to carry a spare LCP mag or two.
-A hundred rounds of good .380 defensive ammo like 90 grain Speer Gold Dots and a few boxes of plain old .380 FMJ to practice with.
-A couple hundred rounds of Winchester .308 150 grain Power X Soft Points.

long shots
-A few more Glock mags. Maybe those new magpul ones because they are half the price of OEM.
-A few more PMAGs
Do you think this is the start of the run or just a little unrelated blip in the market?

Friday Randomness

As the weather gets better the chickens seem to be averaging an egg per- so 6 eggs a day. We are awash with eggs. Discussing this with Wifey, the master of household and culinary affairs, we are thinking about working a couple of egg n something meals into our dinner rotation. Eggs n hashbrowns, eggs n pancakes, that sort of thing. Since we already feed the chicks might as well use the eggs.

On a training note I just sent a goodly sized check to a man who is very experienced in the use of defensive/ tactical pistols. This is the weakest link in my combative/ personal defense situation. I tried to address it some time ago but things didn't work out. Anyway now I'm trying to make this training goal happen. In terms of pistol stuff honestly I am not a total newb but far from where I want to be. Not saying I completely suck but the weakest link is such all the same. While I have some ammo stashed I hope things will work out so I can get a fresh case of 9mm to take out there.

Also I spent a good chunk of time today sharpening my knives. Got to have the EDC working well.


Anyway that is what's going on here today.

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Book Review: No Second Place Winner by Bill Jordan

Today I am going to be reviewing the book No Second Place Winner by Bill Jordan.

This book is definitely old school written by one of the most preeminent western law men, pistol shooters and handgun authorities of his era. He spent 30 years on the border patrol, mostly as far as I can tell on the Texas border as well as fighting as a Marine in WWII and Korea. His shooting skills were legendary from wax bullet exhibitions drawing and point firing at asprin to a legitimate recorded .27 second draw and shot on target! Given that a one second draw to first shot is considered pretty good that is downright amazing. He was also the man behind the S&W Model 19 Combat Magnum which was the peak of the police/ fighting revolver.

This book is pretty short at 114 pages with a few thoughtful blank ones at the end for notes. There is a general opening followed by discussion on selection and maintenance of holsters, pistol grips, handguns, cartridges and bullets. After that it talks about the mechanics of the draw and how to work to build speed without losing accuracy (it's amazing how little some things change). After that it gets into some of the psychological stuff and a variety of different things then there is a summary and closing. Onto the usual format.

The Good: This book is short. At 110 pages I read it in about 2 hours. To say it is short is not an insult. It thoughtfully covered every topic necessary and left nothing out. There were enough 'no shit there he was' stories about cool old school lawmen/ gunfighters to be entertaining but so many as to bring the conversation off track or to add unnecessarily to the length of the work.

As noted before Bill Jordan probably sweated out more wisdom on the Texas border than most shooters, even competent instructors possess. Aside from being a tough guy in a tough place during a tough time some of the tangibles of his capabilities were downright amazing. Given that he lives to the era of shot timers and video cameras his feats carry a lot more weight of accuracy than those of an era where news was only passed by word of mouth and print.

So much of this work is still entirely relevant today. Granted the strictly technological stuff is dated, there isn't a way around that in a book that is 50 years old. Still a person outfitted with the gear described as optimal; a good wide gun belt, a stiff strong side leather holster, a double action 4" revolver with ergonomic grips and semi jacketed lead flat nose bullets could certainly do a whole lot worse. The setup he described is pretty much my perfect woods walking rig.

Gear talk aside so much of what was described is still so relevant.

I particularly enjoyed how Mr Jordan described the transition of different shooting techniques for different ranges. This is something I've thought about and practiced in the past. In short as distance increases you need more accuracy so there is a transition from speed to accuracy. It goes something like this.
0-3 yards- Draw and fire as soon as the gun comes level. Today we have reinvented this into a 'speed rock.This move is shown well in the beginning of the  Collateral 'Briefcase Scene'

3-7 yards. From the speed rock you extend the handgun and bring it out and a little up to get a better shot.
7-15 yards- The hands come together at stomach level.
15-25 meters- Traditional aimed fire at eye level.

So much more good stuff.

The Bad: Like anything that goes way deep into specific gear (vs concepts, etc) as time goes by it becomes dated. While I loves me some k frame S&W's that stuff is way out of date.

The Ugly: beautiful craftsmen quality fighting revolvers like the K Frame Model 19 .357 are no longer widely available and affordable for all but the lowest budgets in hardware and general stores.

Conclusion. You can take the gear stuff with a grain of salt though they represent the peak of the fighting revolver, well minus ammo. Today I'd choose a 158 grain JHP instead of the semi jacketed lead flat nose we tend to call a semi jacketed soft point today.  That being said I don't want to take either one to the chest.

Still gear aside the book has a ton to offer. Heck the 'there he was' stories and the amusing no longer politically correct outdated language is worth the price of the book for entertainment value alone. Seriously though this book has a ton of valuable tips and knowledge to offer. Also if you are so inclined a minute on google can find it in PDF.

Got bad assed old school gunfighter knowledge?

Monday, March 2, 2015

Running, Rifles and Different Things

Last month I only ran 27 miles. An improvement over the last months 22 but not ideal. I started out too hard to be honest. Did 18 miles in the first 12 or 13 days then hurt my knee. Maybe I pushed it too hard (I know I did) ignoring the standard 10% rule. I could have fudged it some since Feb was kind of a slow month but still. I got a little over exuberant I guess. For about a week I think I ran 2 miles as I was hurting. A reminder that I'm not 21 any more and even though I'm far from over the hill there are a lot of miles on my body. So finished up the short month at 27 which wasn't terrible. Would have made my (adjusted) goal of 30 but family stuff got in the way.

This months goal is at least 35, if I feel good It's a total of running and rucking so it's not too bad. This morning I did 4.5. A target of 9-10 a week will give me a little buffer in case things fall short at some point.

Alexander Wolfe posted a pic of his sweet new AR-15. Very cool stuff. While we did some things differently with me opting for a standard weight barrel and a variable powered scope and him for a light weight barrel and an Aimpoint micro it is a nice rifle and I hope it serves him well.

This weeks plans are to do some research on a decent defensive .380 load, keep reading the ham radio book and do a few things towards the food storage record keeping. Also I'll look to put together a set of stuff for the saw and generator to keep them together in a big tuff box.

What are your plans for next week?

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Vaccinations and Hogwarts School of Medicine

I was over at Aesop's Blog which led me to his ( well him and some other folks) other blog Hogwarts School of Grid Down Medicine and Wizardry. Lots of good stuff there. A specific post on vaccination jumped out at me.

One of the interesting things about survivalism/ preparedness/ pro freedom people being such a varied group. They come with different concerns and motivations is there are some folks who are against vaccination for what they believe are medical reasons. Also there are anarchist types whose immediate instinct is to do the exact opposite of what anyone says because it is obviously a conspiracy.

Jimmy Kimmel did a funny but valid bit on vaccination.


Also the piece Pen and Teller did (NSFW due to foul language) is excellent.
Vaccinations are one of (along with clean water and waste disposal) the biggest single reasons childhood mortality in the developed world has dropped so much in the last century. From a preparedness perspective it makes sense to get vaccinated not just for common things in the US but for things that could happen in a longer term emergency. I hesitate to say exactly which diseases that would be as it is outside my area of expertise but small pox comes to mind. Seriously, get your kids vaccinated and make sure all your stuff is up to date.
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