Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Training and Dry Fire Thoughts

People can tend to over train in rarely used and unrealistic areas. Two examples would be speed reloads and rifle to pistol transitions. Statistically speaking in a civilian gunfight you won't shoot a .38 snobby dry let alone a modern double stack handgun holding 15 ish rounds. I won't say t never happens because sometimes it does but it's very rare.

Ditto rifle to pistol transitions. For that to make sense 3 things need to happen simultaneously. First a modern rifle which usually holds 30 rounds and certainly 20 plus needs to run empty (or jam which I didn't mention in pistols because if you use decent modern guns and aren't a complete buffoon it's very unlikely.). In a civilian or even law enforcement context rifle fights end really fast. The reason for this is that rifles stop people, even the much picked at 5.56, very well. Also critically rifles and shotguns are much easier to shoot well than pistols due to a longer length between songs and so many Points of contact. Second I would have to be at pistol range which we could define as 25 meters for simplicity. Third I would have to be in the open otherwise I'd just reload my rifle behind concealment/ cover. The idea of people blazing away at each other at pistol distances in the open until  I run dry won't happen outside an action movie.

These skills are good to know how to do. They are also good to practice. It's just a question of how much of our limited time should go to them. I would be inclined to mostly practice the stuff that will help me win the fight. The biggest single shooting skill there is getting the first hit on target. Shooting someone gets you all up in their OODA loop.

Dry fire training with a timer is essential to improvement in these skills. Unless you have a range outside your back porch and a huge ammo budget you can't shoot every day. You can do dry fire at home for free.

Today's notes.

Equipment. G19 and appendix holster.
Consistently hitting 1.5 from concealment. Dropped to 1.4 and ran 50/50 ish but get rushed and was making mistakes. I'll stick at 1.4 for at least a week. My short term goal is to get dry fire from concealment to 1.3 which giving a little extra time for real shooting get me at 1.4 there. The long term goal is sub 1 second from concealment but that's beyond a dream now.

After that I did a few rifle to pistol transitions to get ready for shooting this weekend. More on that topic later. 

2 comments:

Harry Flashman said...

It used to be gospel that dry firing damaged your weapons. I surmise that's no longer considered a problem today. I wonder if it's because the old weapons did get damaged and the new ones don't, or if it was just a story all the time.

Theother Ryan said...

Harry, I think that may have been valid at so w point a very long time ago. It changed some time before I became an adult so I can't speak to when. Snap caps and other dummy rounds can fill in if needed.

For modern fighting guns it's not needed. Even if twenty or fifty thousand Dry fires would break something the huge benefits in skills would be well worth the small cost of replacing a firing pin or spring.

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