Showing posts with label Escape and Evasion. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Escape and Evasion. Show all posts

Monday, June 12, 2017

Rally Points

Rally Points
The other day I was watching Fear the Walking Dead. That show did not particularly grip me but I was bored so I watched a few episodes. Of course after various bad things the characters kept getting scattered and not having a good plan. This brings us to Rally Points. 
From FM 7-8 
3-5. RALLY POINTS
The leader considers the use and locations of rally points. A rally point is a place designated by the leader where the platoon moves to reassemble and reorganize if it becomes dispersed. 
a. Selection of Rally Points. The leader physically reconnoiters routes to select rally points whenever possible. He selects tentative points if he can only conduct a map reconnaissance. He confirms them by actual inspection as the platoon moves through them. Rally points must--
▪ Be easy to find. 
▪ Have cover and concealment. 
▪ Be away from natural lines of drift. 
▪ Be defendable for short periods. 
b. Types of Rally Points. The most common types of rally points are initial, en route, objective, reentry, and near- and far-side rally points. Soldiers must know which rally point to move to at each phase of the patrol mission. They should know what actions are required there and how long they are to wait at each rally point before moving to another. 
(1) Initial rally point. An initial rally point is a place inside of friendly lines where a unit may assemble and reorganize if it makes enemy contact during the departure of friendly lines or before reaching the first en route rally point. It is normally selected by the commander of the friendly unit. 
(2) En route rally point. The leader designates enroute rally points every 100 to 400 meters (based on the terrain, vegetation, and visibility). When the leader designates a new en route rally point, the previously designated one goes into effect. This precludes uncertainty over which one soldiers should move to if contact is made immediately after the leader designates a new rally point. There are three ways to designate a rally point: 
(a) Physically occupy them for a short period. This is the preferred method. 
(b) Pass by at a distance and designate using arm-and-hand signals. 
(c) Walk through and designate using arm-and-hand signals. 
(3) Objective rally point. The objective rally point (ORP) is a point out of sight, sound, and small-arms range of the objective area. It is normally located in the direction that the platoon plans to move after completing its actions on the objective. The ORP is tentative until the objective is pinpointed. (Figure 3-2.) Actions at or from the ORP include--
▪ Reconnoitering the objective. 
▪ Issuing a FRAGO. 
▪ Disseminating information from reconnaissance if contact was not made. 
▪ Making final preparations before continuing operations; for example, recamouflaging: preparing demolitions; lining up rucksacks for quick recovery; preparing EPW bindings, first aid kits, and litters; and inspecting weapons. 
▪ Accounting for soldiers and equipment after actions at the objective are complete. 
▪ Reestablishing the chain of command after actions at the objective are complete. 
(a) Occupation of an ORP by a squad. In planning the occupation of an ORP, the squad leader considers the following sequence: 
▪ Halt beyond sight, sound, and small-arms weapons range of the tentative ORP (200 to 400 meters in good visibility; 100 to 200 meters in limited visibility). 
▪ Position security. 
▪ Move forward with a compass man and one member of each fire team to confirm the location of the ORP and determine its suitability. Issue a five-point contingency plan before departure. 
▪ Position the Team A soldier at 12 o'clock, and the Team B soldier at 6 o'clock in the ORF. Issue them a contingency plan and return with the compass man. 
▪ Lead the squad into the ORP, position Team A from 9 to 3 o'clock and Team B from 3 to 9 o'clock. 
NOTE: The squad may also occupy the ORP by force. This requires more precise navigation, but eliminates separating the squad. 
(c) Occupation of an ORP by a platoon. The platoon leader should consider the same sequence in planning the occupation of an ORP. He brings a soldier from each squad on his reconnaissance of the ORP and positions them at the 10, 2, and 6 o'clock positions. The first squad in the order of march establishes the base leg (10 to 2 o'clock). The trailing squads occupy from 2 to 6 o'clock and 6 to 10 o'clock, respectively. 
(4) Reentry rally point. The reentry rally point is located out of sight, sound, and small-arms weapons range of the friendly unit through which the platoon will return. This also means that the RRP should be outside the final protective fires of the friendly unit. The platoon occupies the RRP as a security perimeter. 
(5) Near-and far-side rally points. These rally points are on the near and far side of danger areas. If the platoon makes contact while crossing the danger area and control is lost, soldiers on either side move to the rally point nearest them. They establish security, reestablish the chain of command, determine their personnel and equipment status, and continue the patrol mission, link up at the ORP, or complete their last instructions. 
End Block quote. 
Simply put a rally point is a place your group plans to meet if they become scattered. 
Rally points need to be readily identifiable. Saying 400M west won’t work. Have a scattered confused half asleep people try to do that and they will all end up in different spots. On the other hand an identifiable feature such as ‘the abandoned car by the blackberry patch’ is much more doable. 
It is important to consider the circumstances which would lead you to using a rally point. Here are two considerations.
1- A rally point needs to be out of the immediate affected area of the thing that is causing you to leave. For a house fire it might be 50 yards. In violent situations a rally point out of the immediate area (say sight/sound and rifle fire) is appropriate. This distance varies by the terrain. In a city it might be a couple blocks, in dense woods it might be a couple hundred yards. In the plains or desert it might be much further. If you are worried about a problem at the nuclear power plant it might be 10 miles. The point is that you want to reorganize and reconsolidate outside of the immediate threat of the event.
2- Does it matter if people can see you? If you aren’t worried about people seeing you (house fire, concert, etc) then it doesn’t matter. On the other hand if you are worried about being arrested or attacked then you need a more discrete rally point

In a benign but still important civilian context this could be where you meet in a fire plan.
For the sake of this discussion we will make up a family named the Smiths. They are survivalists. The family is made up of the parents and two children who are 8 and 10. Old enough to generally follow basic guidance if it has been practiced but you wouldn’t want them traveling distances alone.
The Smith family has a few rally points for different situations.
Fire- The big oak tree in the front yard. 
The oak tree worked great for a fire but fails the common sense test for danger because they want to escape whatever the danger was. While outside the scope of this article they need a plan. 
Attack- Two rally points. Water and fire. Water is an old broken down pump shack 300 yards away in the woods roughly east of their house. Fire is a small old fire circle some kids used to use in a little depression a couple hundred yards generally west. 
Both of these have an alternate point that leads in the direction of their planned route of evasion. That is outside of the scope of this post and recommend looking at John Mosbys posts on escape and evasion. 
With these rally points the family needs a plan. 
Maybe the plan is for Dad engages the threat at a high rate of fire, ideally with a large capacity weapon like a 75 dr drum for his AK. Once Dad ‘has their heads down’ Mom (with a light pack and her rifle) moves out the side door with the kids, makes for the treeline then heads to the old pump house 300 yards away on the back corner of the property. 
The plan is for Dad to give them a minute to get free then he follows. Dad moved in a different direction and takes a halt at the top of a crest with a big log there and waits a few minutes to see if he is being followed. If it seems quiet Dad moves to the rally point to link up with the rest of the family. 
Moms plan is to wait for 15 minutes or until she hears a continuation of gunfire (after the presumed break when Dad bolts from the house) and then move to an alternate location further away. 
For patrol base/ camp or I would think a home having 2 rally points in opposite directions is the common practice. If the attackers are to the east you would go to the western one and visa versa. Of course in the real world they won’t be exactly 180 degrees apart but they should be in generally opposite directions. 
It would be prudent for the family to cache some supplies at these rally points. Common sense tells us if they have to flee for their lives at 3 am they won’t be idling along with 100lb ruck sacks. A small (certainly sub 40 lb) backpack could be doable but that might not even happen. Say they stash a little bit of water and food, some medical stuff for trauma or boo boos and some loaded mags for their rifles. 2x 5 gallon buckets should do. 
Lastly they have a plan for if they are separated and there is a disaster at the Nuclear base, reactor, spill on the train tracks. The plan is for Dad to get the kids since his work is closer to their school. Mom will probably be home so she will grab as much stuff from the list as she can and head out. After accomplishing their tasks they will leave separately without waiting. They will meet at the Denny’s in a town 20 miles away.
When they travel they want a plan should something happen. Remembering different points is complicated and mundane for a road trip. They have a floating plan (which would really only work in a city type environment) so should they become separated they will meet at the nearest McDonalds. If the McDonalds closes they will go to the nearest Greyhound station. The goal here is places every decent sized town has which are fairly safe and where it is not unusual for a person to wait for some time. 
I may write about this more but my intent is to give you some ideas.
Got Rally Points?


Monday, September 19, 2016

Urban E&E/ Get Home Kit

Monday, June 1, 2015

From Around The Web

Lucky Gunner does an interesting post on mounting optics to the AK platform. An Ultimak rail with an Aimpoint micro is probably the way to go for a defensive rifle. Honestly around the range you would need a scope you probably have the wrong rifle in a ( a 7.62x39 chambered) AK. That being said I can see the utility of a low variable or fixed power scope on one for older eyes or hunting where target discrimination (2 point not OK but 3 are, etc). For that option I would either use one of the side mounted rails or replace the whole top cover with a purpose made one. I know Texas Weapons Systems makes one and think Midwest Industries does too.

John Mosby talks Escape and Evasion 1 and 2. While I certainly would not disagree with anything John said I wish to put some emphasis on two points from the articles. First is physical fitness. If you are going to make some sort of gaping burst to get out of the immediate area they could cordon then make a slow determined slog to wherever you are going you have to be able to physically cover many miles under stress over multiple days. Second is consistently having some useful tools on your person and a more robust fighting load or get home bag readily available will give you a fighting chance to have some gear if things go down.

Max Velocity talks about different gear he is producing in partnership with AMH Tactical Gear. I am starting to get a case of gear lust for that chest rig.

Tactical Professor, who runs an excellent blog, talks about a shooting case up in Maine. It is one of those messy family farm/ small business things. This situation should have been settled by people acting like adults over a cup of coffee or worst case gone to civil litigation but instead one guy ended up dead and another is probably going to spend the rest of their life in jail. 

Take away's
1- Don't shoot people over stuff! Aside from ethical considerations we could look at it strictly from a financial angle. Lawyers and trials are really expensive.
2- Know your local laws. This might have been a different case in a place with a less restrictive rule of retreat.
3- Having a less lethal weapons bears consideration. A can of mace might have stopped this incident but that is unlikely. It might ave given the guy enough space to get out of these.  More realistically it could have showed that the man was trying to use the smallest amount of force necessary and the much larger, younger man kept attacking.
4- This case was further muddled because while the family were probably in the wrong there was not a clear criminal act going on like say if one person owned or rented the shop and the other was trespassing.

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Bucket Cache Discussion Continued

From my post on the planned Bucket Cache I got some good comments. From others it seems apparent I did not explain my concept of use clearly. I will reply to the comments below. Comments will be in bold and my replies will be in italics.
Unknown said...
I've done this and think it's a great idea. I have several buckets and a couple bags at various friends houses. Cheap kit that's theirs if they need it. All I really added that you don't have is a change of clothes (several weights of socks) and a rain jacket of some sort. I also tossed in a couple of those draw string style backpack/gym bags that I obtained free from various places. That way I can carry the gear if I'm without my regular kit, or a second person can divide the load with me.

--L 


 Ryan here: A bag to carry the stuff is a good idea. Depending on space in the bucket after I add the planned stuff a set of clothes is a decent idea. 
Jamison said...
Don't go with the Tampons or anything of that ilk for a medical kit. Just as cost effective and actually works are ABD pads, 7.09$ prime shipping from Amazon. There are quite a few studies out there that advise people not to use feminine hygiene products for trauma. Tampons and Pads are used to soak up the blood and clot it internally where as an ABD pad and gauze are made to speed clotting.

Kerlix or Rolled Gauze, ABD pads and Gorilla tape are all low cost and effective first aid supplies. They might cost you a little more than a box of tampons but it works so much better. Throw in some triangular bandages with safety pins, a couple of pairs of gloves and you have a good low cost medical kit that you can make work for a lot of trauma situations.

http://www.amazon.com/Kerlix-Gauze-Bandage-Rolls-Small/dp/B0009Q01TU/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1427682317&sr=8-4&keywords=kerlix

http://www.amazon.com/Medline-NON21450-Sterile-Abdominal-Pads/dp/B0070P2Q64/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1427681952&sr=8-1&keywords=abd+pad

http://www.amazon.com/Dynarex-Triangular-Bandages-Poly-Bagged-Safety/dp/B00096SC50/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1427682506&sr=8-1&keywords=triangular+bandage

These three items are what a little over 30$ from amazon and you can make six kits out of it, Two kerlix rolls, two Triangular bandages and say 4 abd pads, wrap some duct tape around a Bic pen (Cut pen to length) or a hotel key card, add a key ring or small carabiner to use with the triangular bandage as a windlass for an impromptu tourniquet. Seal in a zip-lock or vacuum bag, say 10$ top per kit for a good basic trauma setup. 


Ryan here:  1) My planned medical budget is like $3. I have an IFAK in my primary gear so the traumatic injury piece of the medical kit is an after thought. All joking aside I will look at budget options before going completely white trash IFAC.

tweell said...
Some oatmeal, rice, lentils, split peas and/or beans - cheap food.
A small pot from a garage sale or dollar store.
Basic spices.
Candles.


Ryan here: I fear I didn't explain my plans correctly. I am not looking to hang out for any period of time. My goal is to have enough consumables to eat a good meal, maybe lie up for a few hours and then walk for another day.

In terms of food I am looking at calorie dense stuff that is ready to go but better if you heat it up. Something like a couple each of canned food, top ramen, oatmeal and tuna. Also probably a dozen granola bars for go food. I will not have the time or energy to boil up a pot of beans.

Anonymous said...
5 pounds flour, pint powdered milk, salt, baking powder - make bannock, gravy. Gill net - sure way to get fish. A few rounds of ammo for each of your weapons. Fire starter kit. Knife. Oil for weapons. Small tools. 

Ryan here: See the last post. I like where you are going for a survival cache but this is much more of a resupply of consumables to go a few more miles. As to the food I'm not going to cut a nice stick, start a fire and make some bannock. Heating up some ramen or chili is about the max amount of effort I would consider. As to the gill net I am not looking to sustain over the long term. Do not need tools to gather food, I need enough water and calories to get a few more miles down the road. 
Anonymous said...
I'm thinking a good multi-tool over a tool kit, though a small pair of ignition pliers is a very versatile lightweight addition. The string pack idea likewise is good - you want something that appears 'sheeple friendly'.

Maybe a couple of 5 hour energy shots ? I don't know their shelf life though. A water filter straw would also be a wise choice as well.

Good ideas above - thank you for the post! 


Ryan here: I'm not too worried about tools past a knife as my concept of use is on foot. Agree an option to carry the stuff is a good idea. A couple 5 hours or some caffeine pills is a good idea I will use. 
TEOTWAWKI Blog / Alexander Wolf said...
A lot depends on your route/plans. Traveling over land through forest/swamp would be different from traveling through urban or suburban turf, etc.

Distance / time needed to sustain you would be important.

Most of the time, you'd have your vehicle with you - at least to start out. Make sure at least your vehicle kit is squared away before worrying about caching stuff. Your vehicle = a cache on wheels.

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Bucket Cache

I am planning on putting together another cache. In looking at lightening up my get home bag and larger get home plan it became apparent to me that consumables could be an issue if the absolute worst case happened and I had to walk the entire way or even walk in a less direct route. With weight of consumables one can get to a catch 22 place where carrying enough consumables means you will move slower and use/ need more consumables.

The concept of use is a pre positioned resupply of water and some food en route. Sort of a logistical speedball that is sitting ready to go. Water is darn heavy and you genuinely need it to survive.

I plan to put a gallon or a gallon and a half of water in the cache.

Also mostly because I'm putting something together anyway I want to include some food, medical stuff and other basic survival doo dads. Since weight/ bulk is not at a premium the food will probably be a few MRE's as well as a couple cans and some granola bars or something. The medical will likely be some ghetto trauma stuff (think tampon and duct tape) as well as a few each of pepto, benadryl and Tylenol and some baby wipes. The survival stuff will probably be a couple contractor bags, a hundred feet of 550 cord, a Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Outdoor Knife with Sandvik Stainless Steel Blade, Black, 4.1-Inch , a lighter and a couple ranger bands.

My intent is to put this mostly together from stuff I already have. I'll have to purchase a thing or two but the total cost should be under $25 most of which is the knife.

Thoughts?

Friday, January 30, 2015

1k Cache: Some Options That Make Sense To Me

Urban Escape and Evasion
Glock 9mm or .40 if that is your thing($400)
Mags n ammo $100 (500) I'd like to have 3 mags and 100 rounds of ammo.
Burner cell phone $30 (530)
Knife, folding. A basic CRKT or Kershaw. Anything decent at that price $25 (555)
Backpack day/ kid school bag sized either cheap new one or better used one $25 (580)
Boots, surplus $20 (600)
Flashlight, small $20 (620)
Belt and holster $40 (660)
Good will clothes and hat $40 (700)
Cash in small bills $300 (1k)

Rural Escape and Evasion/ Minute Man back up
Military pattern rifle $500. Whichever AK or AR you can find first at this price point. Something like a Mini-14 would suffice. 
Mags and ammo $150 (650). I'd like to have at least 5 or so mags and enough ammo to load them at least once.
Carry system for mags n such$30 (680). Probably ALICE though maybe you could piece together something with a FLIC MOLLE vest.
Basic gun cleaning stuff $20 (700). Probably a toothbrush, a rag and some lube.
Gently used boots, probably USGI issue. $20 (720)
Decent set of used clothes from the good will. Ideally good durable stuff in earth tones. Includes a hat and belt.$40 (760)
Poncho in earth tone. $30 (790)
Fleece, jacket and hat used or Wally World. In earth tone. $20 (810)
Grab and go food. Granola bars, a couple tuna pouches or whatever. $20 (830)
Cheap binoculars. $20 (850)
2x water bottles and 2 bottles of water purification stuff. $30 (880)
Backpack to put all this stuff in. $30 (910)
Medical kit. Very ghetto IFAK and a few feel good items like ibuprophen, bandaids, etc$20 (950)
Mora kniv $15 (965)
Remaining $35 can pad the gun and ammo budgets a bit.

Monday, July 29, 2013

Advice From The Pro's, Solid Gold

John Mosby discussing all manner of gear and systems. It touches on his systems and the gear he prefers as well as the methodology behind it, plus the strengths and weaknesses of various other options. Great stuff!!!

Pastor Joe Fox, who has all manner of Army merit badges and IIRC taught at SERE school is doing a very interesting video series on escape and evasion.

Deny the start point!!!

  Gaping Burst!!!

Sunday, November 4, 2012

The Walking Dead: Killer Within

Continuing our series on The Walking Dead.

The guy busting the chain securing the fence and baiting a bunch of Walkers into their little prison hidey hole is not boding well for this awkward roomie thing. I can't see myself accepting that sort of situation; one way or another somebody would have to go.

Rick's crew are getting settled into the prison which makes sense. One should strive to continually improve their situation in terms of security and comfort whenever possible. Seeing the prisoners out and about and potentially baiting them into a trap is not an indicator for good things to come. The group's discussion of what to do with these people is interesting. 

On the bright side Rick's crew learned from their experiences at the farm and are staging their vehicles and presumably supplies to leave in a hurry if need be. Still as Commander Zero noted the group would really benefit from a system of caches. Even a little bit of food, some clothes, blankets and tools plus weapons if they could let them survive in a less unpleasant fashion if they have to e and e to get away from a Zombie horde.

The open gate turned out to be really ugly. The crew have a whole lot of perimeter to man and not a lot of folks to do it. This is a good reminder that an obstacle will only serve to delay enemies and only really do that well if covered by folks with guns.

T Dog getting bit is bad. Not just rather obviously for him but for the group. They are losing a strong healthy guy which are in short supply these days. Hopefully everybody else makes it but still bad.

The Governor hitting golf balls from that barrier reminds me of guy's driving balls off HESCO walls into the desert in Afghanistan.

Those sirens going off at the prison point to somebody with inside knowledge AKA one of the prisoners setting this up. To top off all of the awesomeness that is going on at the prison Lori seems to be giving birth.

It turns out that the guy Rick left for dead in the prison yard full of zombies didn't actually die. Seriously if movies and TV have taught you nothing do not ever leave somebody to die and assume they are dead. Take the time and put a bullet in their head, slit their throat, bash their skull in with a rock or otherwise make absolutely sure they are dead. The other prisoner saving Rick's life then handing over that big shiny Colt should earn some serious good will from the group. Taking in new people, especially convict's is iffy but they are running pretty short on healthy folks who can work and fight.

The C Section without anestesia on a prison floor during the Zombie Apocalypse was pretty graphic and a bit much for my pregnant wife.

Offing 3 main characters (T Dog, Carol and Lori if I saw it right) in a single episode was pretty nuts. It made SOA killing off Opie out of the blue seem minor in comparison. That is a lot of holes to fill and people will step up to fill roles and relationships will adjust to the new situation.

Anyway I've got to get moving towards bed.




Monday, August 27, 2012

Lizard Farmer talks breaking contact and evading in the case that your home/ retreat/ compound/ bunker is overwhelmed. Lizard Farmer's words do not need to be rehashed but I have a few things to add. First I cannot tell you what would sort of situation would make you need to pull a runner. It is all METTC (mission, enemy, terrain, troops, time, civilians) dependent. Since I do not rely on acronyms I will spell it out in plain English. If you have a stone house that would stop anything short of an anti tank weapon with 600 meters of standoff and 12 shooters all of whom can ring 12" steel all day and night long at 600 meters and are being attacked by 4-5 goblins your situation is very different than a family with 2-3 shooters in a wood framed house that will not stop a .22 with 50 meters standoff being attacked by 8 goblins. I cannot say exactly what your bail out criteria should be but you would be well advised to put some thought into it. Second this is a reminder about the importance of caches. You don't want to die valiantly in place defending the doomstead. That is just really stupid. Either gather your tribe and take it back later or go someplace else, at least you and yours will still be alive.

This brings us back to caches.You are a lot less likely to do something stupid fighting an untenable situation and get your family killed (or worse) if all your food, weapons and equipment are not in the basement. Knowing there is ample food and equipment in caches or alternate locations will make the hard decision to abandon your home easier.

Anyway please do check out the excellent post from Lizard Farmer.

Brigid wrote about home defense and it is solidly worth checking out. Some stuff has been covered here or elsewhere and some is new ground.

In putting together this post I stumbled into an old guest post Dispersing for a Bit that was written by a man who made his living chasing down folks who did just what he writes about for a long time.

Saturday, February 25, 2012

E and E Baby- Fun Watching Mantracker

Yesterday I watched Mantracker for awhile. I talked a bit about the show some time ago. Today I have some more basic thoughts:

First be in shape. This means being able to run fast for a short period, at a moderate pace for awhile and walk carrying a moderate load for many miles.

Second have good broken in boots. I know it is easy to say a splurge is worth it if you have the cash but low quality books cause all sorts of problems and generally fail to live up to basic expectations.

Third condition your feet to walking carrying a load while wearing boots. This is admittedly sort of a synthesis of the first two but it is it's own beast because running wearing light shoes (which would let you be in shape) does not translate into properly conditioned feet. Feet are a place where some folks are lucky and others are not. If you are lucky then just keep up with your general PT and wear broken in boots. Thankfully I fall into this group.

If someone using a higher speed form of transportation is following you there are really three options. First you can go where they cannot follow. This is a pretty desirable option though it only works if there is a widespread area sufficient in size to lose them or hide. A couple acre swamp or a single nasty ridge probably won't do it as a single exit point or two can be watched. The second option is to level the playing field. A horse or an ATV or a car is not hard to put out of action but armored vehicles are a lot more problematic. The third option would be to just hope that you can lose them. Think needle in haystack or a field full of haystacks. This is probably more of a hope than a plan. If there is a good line of sight or they have dogs this option really sucks.

Lastly knowing how to navigate and having the basic tools (compass and appropriate maps) to do so is essential. Hard to get away from somebody and get to wherever you are going without knowing where you are or in which direction you are headed.
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