Showing posts with label Lucky Gunner. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Lucky Gunner. Show all posts

Saturday, March 21, 2015

Firearm Selection Criteria: Concept of Use, Reliability, Commonality, Affordability, and Personal Preference

Today I want to talk about a methodology for selection of firearms and arguably other tools. I put these in order intentionally; the way I did it was working through the perspective of a person trying to decide on a type of weapon to purchase. It is also worth noting I am focusing on weapons for practical, predominantly defensive, use. For sporting weapons reliability is less important as the worst case is a ruined day of hunting or whatever your hobby is. Weapons purchased for enjoyment of shooting or collecting can fail to meet any of the criteria and still be your thing. If you like shooting black powder rifles or surplus Swiss Schmidd Rubens in 7.5x55 which is currently on sale for .51 cents a round at Lucky Gunner then roll with it, the act is it's own reward. So here we go.

The first category is concept of use. It took a lot of consideration to put this one first. The reason is that it is going to decide the general type of weapons you are going to be looking into.

I will explain in a brief tangent. A gun can be great but entirely wrong for what you want it to do. A Glock 22 is the pistol most likely to be in an LEO's holster in any town USA. A fishermen in Alaska might very well be packing a Ruger or S&W .44 mag. A normal guy down in Florida who wants a discrete summer CCW piece he doesn't need to dress around might be packing a tiny .380 like a Ruger LCP. Lets say they all rotate leaving the fishermen with the Glock 40, the cop with the Ruger LCP and the guy down in Florida with the big ole .44 mag. Obviously this is a big old ball of fail.

Think of it like walking into a big well stocked gun store. The fishermen would go to the racks of big bore revolvers, specifically the double action ones. The LEO would gravitate to the racks of semi automatic pistols specifically looking at the compact and full sized models. The guy from Florida would go look at the smaller semi automatic pistols and revolvers.

While you obviously need to look at the general type of weapons that fit your need I would urge against being TOO SPECIFIC. The reason for this is a tendency to create artificially specific requirements to lead you down a path to a gun you want and feel justified in getting whatever you want. One might say this is fine. I disagree for two reasons. First people do not look to justify a decision they inherently know is sound. They are looking to justify a decision because it is too expensive, entirely unneeded or has other various downsides. Second by putting these arbitrary specific criteria at the beginning of the selection process (vs at the end) they may come to a conclusion that has some fundamental problems.

The second category is reliability. Guns owned to save your life in an emergency need to be reliable. I'm not talking 'this gun is reliable if it has been cleaned the day before, is lubricated just so and has special ammunition made of unicorn horns and big foot bones' but under all manner of conditions.

Generally the easiest way to get this is to buy a firearm made to a professional standard. As such it might not be a bad idea to look at weapons used by the military (not just ours) and law enforcement. I don't want to get into any arguments but we're talking big, quality companies like Ruger, Glock, Smith and Wesson, Remington, Sig Sauer, H&K, etc. Avoid fly by night manufacturers and 'price point' brands. Of course even the lowest end Saturday Night Special manufacturer probably, if just by luck, managed to put out a couple guns that work really well. If you happen to have one of those then rock with it. That being said generally after one digs into the 'my Ghetto Blaster Pimptastic Model' works perfectly they find the gun is actually used very little. They haven't tested their guns enough for anything to happen.

Next comes commonality. Commonality of manufacturer, model and chambering. There are a lot of reasons for this. The biggest single one is that common manufacturers/ models and cartridges are common for a reason. Glock hasn't sold millions of 9mm Glock 17's  because it is a piece of junk. Winchester Model 94 30-30 stood the test of time and stayed in production for over a century because they were great rifles and people loved them.

Additionally commonality of a weapon tends to mean more accessories, holsters, custom parts, etc are available for that weapon. Pretty much every holster company makes every model for say a Glock 17 or Sig P226. You can't say that about a Broomhandled Mauser.


Commonality also goes a long way in showing you what sort of support there is for a firearm. Support in terms of spare parts should something break, continued availability of mags, etc all is largely dictated by a weapons commonality. It is a lot easier to find a spring or pin for an AR-15in 5.56 than for an FN-FAL in 280 British.


These are considerations for any firearm owner. A preparedness inclined person is going to weigh availability (which is linked to commonality) of mags and spare parts a whole lot higher than a normal shooter. In an ugly situation I would be able to find say a spare part for an AK-47 or a Glock 17 9mm in my community. It would be a big hassle and I would pay dearly for it, which is why I stock spare parts, but I could get it. On the other hand if the guns were a new boutique rifle  in 6.8 and a Makarov pistol there might not be spare parts within 500 miles which I would not be able to find them in an emergency or realistically get them. Commonality and the ability to trade/ cross level/ scavenge parts/ mags has been weighted heavily for me in recent years and has been a seriously limiting factor in my weapons choices.

Hate to be a buzz kill but affordability matters. We all have budgets and competing demands. I believe owning good modern weapons is important but we have to be realistic. If you are on a $500 Glock/ S&W M&P/ Springfield XD budget there isn't much point in looking at $950 stainless steel SIGs, let alone 3k custom 1911's.

Look beyond the cost of the gun. Consider the cost of mags, spare parts, ammo, etc all to equip the gun however you deem necessary. For example for a fighting pistol like my Glock 19 I like to have at least 10 mags and 1,000 rounds of ammo.  The cost difference figured this way between say my G19 and an H&K .45 is going to be significant.

Awhile back Commander Zero broke down exactly how long it would take to save enough money for a Glock and an AR-15 earning just minimum wage. A couple months of delivering Pizza's a few shifts a week after work would do it. Granted that would suck but if you really want some decent guns and money is tight it would be a way to do it.

Personal Preference comes last. We have already narrowed down the pool of potential options that fit our concept of use to reliable, fairly common models within our budget. Now we can look within those options and make personal preference decisions.
James Yeager talks personal preference. In short he thinks it is a bunch of crap. I agree with Mr. Yeagers general point that personal preference can be taken to extremes. In some circles it is an 'everyone is a unique and special snowflake' sort of thing. This is doubly true with inexperienced shooters. The truth is that your unique choice might in fact be stupid.

Where I disagree with Mr Yeager is that, within an intentionally selected pool of options I see no issue with people making choices based on personal preference. Maybe a person is in the market for a defensive shotgun and logically narrowed their choices down to the Mossberg 500 and Remington 870. Say that person is a lefty so they go for the Mossberg 500 whose controls are easier to handle. Say a perspective LEO was looking for a duty weapon and for the sake of this discussion he had free reign to carry any non single action compact or full sized 9mm, 40 S&W or .45 acp .That young man might handle all of those pistols and rent the three or four he liked best to shoot.

So to close out on personal preference I do believe personal preference has a valid role in firearm selection so long as it is within a pool of weapons that meet some logical pre determined criteria.

Anyway I hope this gives you a way to think about future purchases and hopefully save the hassle of buying the wrong gun(s).


Thoughts?



Friday, March 20, 2015

Pocket Pistol Ammo, The Arctic, GEN Petraeus on Iraq and Other Stuff

Meister linked to a cool new .380 round by Lehigh Defense. Up till now you have had two options for .380 ammo. JHP ammo, including some good stuff like 90 grain Speer Gold Dots that arguably fails to penetrate sufficiently for some tastes. The other option is .380 FMJ which penetrates but leaves a hole many consider less than impressive. Buffalo Bore makes a 100 grain semi jacketed lead flat nose which looks promising but it is a BB load so it's as heavy and fast as possible; as such it's probably better suited to a (relatively) larger and sturdier pistol like Walther PPK, Bersa or Glock 42 than the ultra small/ light pocket rockets.

This new Lehigh round penetrates like an FMJ with better temporary and permanent wound cavities.

It bears serious consideration. Once I've done a little more research and have some jingle in my pocket I'll probably buy a couple boxes.

This chart of Russia's Military presence in the Arctic is interesting. Looks like they are setting conditions to dominate a future resource grab up there. 

GEN (RET) Petraeus talks the Islamic State, Iraq and Iran. Considering he is the jedi master of COIN and (as much as any one person possibly could) our success, if only temporary, in Iraq can be attributed to him I listen when the man talks.

Larry Vickers breaking down the famous Collateral 'briefcase scene'. That has been one of my favorite movie gun fight scenes for awhile. Larry's breakdown of the scene is worth watching.

Friday, March 13, 2015

Tiny .380 Concept of Use

As you may know I recently bought a Ruger LCP custom. Our friend Meister talked about the LCP as a handy little carry piece. I have been thinking about this and it bears some discussion.

-A little .380 like the Ruger LCP/ Kel Tech P3AT/ S&W Bodyguard has a couple of apparent uses. The first is as a deep concealment piece. The kind of little pistol you can carry pretty much anywhere has a pretty solid role in any battery. Secondly they are an obvious choice as a back up gun.

-These guns fill a valid role. I owned a Kahr but ended up selling it because it didn't bring a unique capability to the table. 

-A couple of buddies have a two pistol combo of a full sized handgun and a little .380. They respectively own a Springfield TRP 1911/ Kel Tech P3AT and a Springfield XD and Kahr P380. This combo has a lot of merit. A full sized house/ SHTF gun and a nice little carry piece cover both ends of the spectrum.

-As to carrying a little .380 there are certainly some compromises to be made. They are handy as can be and can slip into any pocket. Obviously they are of a rather small caliber, not especially easy to shoot and don't carry a bunch of rounds.

-One must do their own risk analysis and cost to benefit on whether carrying such a small pistol is for them. I can't make choices for anybody else.  Personally I live in a very safe little community. My odds of facing a robber coming out of the grocery store with a gallon of milk for the kiddo's at 7pm are infinitesimal. As such the convenience of slipping a handy little pistol to slip in my pocket is useful with minimal risk.

I am comfortable with the LCP in my pocket in this sleepy little town. Now if I was visiting my sister in Houston I would be carrying the LCP, as a back up to my Glock 19.

-Ammo is an interesting discussion. Meister and the smart guy from box of truth both recommend FMJ since no JHP ammo is capable of sufficient penetration to meet the FBI standards. I am currently packing some 90 grain Hornady JHP ammo that I got a box of at the gun store but I have to do some more research on the matter.  I like the .380 Speer gold dots as well as generally liking Gold Dots in pretty much every caliber.

I think between the Ruger LCP and Glock 19 most of my pistol needs are met. 

Got pocket pistol?

Saturday, March 7, 2015

2016 Election Shortage Starting Early?

The whole M855 thing came up then it started a general run on affordable bulk 5.56 ammo like PMC MTAC M193 55gr ammo at$80/200 . T Blog noted there may be a shortage on. So far it is just 5.56 ammo but it might just spread. This brings up the almost inevitable 2016 election hysteria that is coming at some point or another. Which got me to thinking about exactly what I want to acquire in the next few months before the semi scheduled madness occurs.

What's on my list? In no particular order of priority:
-An AR-15 stripped lower just in case. As of late I've seen a trend of slightly used, or sometimes unfired upper's at fire sale prices on the local market. Lots of guys here seem to want to build an AR and don't quite get it done, flip uppers to build a new project or just plain need money. Having a lower to complete one of those would be nice.
-At least 2 more mags for the LCP.
-Some sort of way to carry a spare LCP mag or two.
-A hundred rounds of good .380 defensive ammo like 90 grain Speer Gold Dots and a few boxes of plain old .380 FMJ to practice with.
-A couple hundred rounds of Winchester .308 150 grain Power X Soft Points.

long shots
-A few more Glock mags. Maybe those new magpul ones because they are half the price of OEM.
-A few more PMAGs
Do you think this is the start of the run or just a little unrelated blip in the market?

Friday Randomness

As the weather gets better the chickens seem to be averaging an egg per- so 6 eggs a day. We are awash with eggs. Discussing this with Wifey, the master of household and culinary affairs, we are thinking about working a couple of egg n something meals into our dinner rotation. Eggs n hashbrowns, eggs n pancakes, that sort of thing. Since we already feed the chicks might as well use the eggs.

On a training note I just sent a goodly sized check to a man who is very experienced in the use of defensive/ tactical pistols. This is the weakest link in my combative/ personal defense situation. I tried to address it some time ago but things didn't work out. Anyway now I'm trying to make this training goal happen. In terms of pistol stuff honestly I am not a total newb but far from where I want to be. Not saying I completely suck but the weakest link is such all the same. While I have some ammo stashed I hope things will work out so I can get a fresh case of 9mm to take out there.

Also I spent a good chunk of time today sharpening my knives. Got to have the EDC working well.


Anyway that is what's going on here today.

Monday, March 2, 2015

Running, Rifles and Different Things

Last month I only ran 27 miles. An improvement over the last months 22 but not ideal. I started out too hard to be honest. Did 18 miles in the first 12 or 13 days then hurt my knee. Maybe I pushed it too hard (I know I did) ignoring the standard 10% rule. I could have fudged it some since Feb was kind of a slow month but still. I got a little over exuberant I guess. For about a week I think I ran 2 miles as I was hurting. A reminder that I'm not 21 any more and even though I'm far from over the hill there are a lot of miles on my body. So finished up the short month at 27 which wasn't terrible. Would have made my (adjusted) goal of 30 but family stuff got in the way.

This months goal is at least 35, if I feel good It's a total of running and rucking so it's not too bad. This morning I did 4.5. A target of 9-10 a week will give me a little buffer in case things fall short at some point.

Alexander Wolfe posted a pic of his sweet new AR-15. Very cool stuff. While we did some things differently with me opting for a standard weight barrel and a variable powered scope and him for a light weight barrel and an Aimpoint micro it is a nice rifle and I hope it serves him well.

This weeks plans are to do some research on a decent defensive .380 load, keep reading the ham radio book and do a few things towards the food storage record keeping. Also I'll look to put together a set of stuff for the saw and generator to keep them together in a big tuff box.

What are your plans for next week?

Saturday, February 28, 2015

New Pocket Pistol

Was running around today and swung through the local gun store to fondle a Ruger LCP. They had one of those new Ruger LCP Custom's. I handled it and liked it. The price difference between it and the baseline one was $30. The money gets you actual sights and a different trigger. Decided to go for it.

So now I am the owner of a Ruger LCP Custom. Picked up a box of JHP ammo and a box of FMJ to try it out with. Ordered a Safariland 25-1881-21 Inside Pocket Holster to carry it in. Going to have to get some spare mags and more ammo as soon as the budget and other projects will allow.

Do you own a pistol in this category? If so what are your thoughts on it?

Thursday, February 26, 2015

The Kahr is Gone, The Kahr is Gone Away.

Sold my Kahr CW9 today. The S&W 642 is also on dangerous ground waiting for the right sale or trade. If things go right it will be gone inside the week. A couple of things drove that decision.

Primarily I have gotten back to packing around my Glock 19 a whole lot more. How did I do this? Well I had to get some new pants. A couple pair of my pants were just plain worn out. So when I replaced them I bought pants 2 inches bigger around than I am around. Actually brought my Glock to the store when I purchased them to try them on with it. After that I went into the closet and threw out my shirts that were not sufficiently sized to let me wear the Glock 19 at 3 o'clock discretely. That combined with my blade tech belt and Bianchi professional 100 and I'm back to packing the G19 a lot.

So how does this relate to the Kahr? Well given these, not entirely insignificant accommodations the concealability of my Glock 19 is not very different from the Kahr CW9.  Since they fall into the same general footprint if I could carry one I could carry the other. Why would I carry a gun with half the bullets that I do not shoot as well? Meister was right to carry a bigger gun and dress around it a little bit. Still there are some situations where you just can't carry that much of a pistol. Or maybe you are running to the corner store for milk in a sleepy, safe area. Or it is August in Louisiana and 100 degrees with sauna like humidity and blazing sun. A smaller gun does have a role.

Looking hard at getting a pocket sized .380. It is true this is another caliber but it is the quint essential carry a lot, shoot a little gun. The kind of gun where you get 4 or so mags, 150 or so rounds of good JHP ammo, 250 rounds of FMJ for practice and call it good.

Specifically I am looking at the Ruger LCP. The price difference between them and the Kel Tec is negligible and well, Ruger makes better guns than Kel Tec. Also Kel Tec's business model of making guns with an enormous lemon rate and offering a lifetime warranty knowing they sell a price point gun to people who, on average shoot very little bothers me. A defensive firearm should work out of the box, not after being sent back to the factory twice, you doing an internal polish job and racking the slide 10,000 times to smooth out all the manufacturing mistakes. It would take a lot to convince me that Kel Tec guns to a professional standard with any consistence. I know some KT's work but many do not. Also KT's seem to have gone up in price considerably. The difference between a Kel Tec P3AT and a Ruger LCP in my AO is about $50. That is the price of a decent bottle of Scotch or a meal out for the family. If it was $100+ that would be a different discussion but for such a small difference I see no reason to settle, especially since I have the money.

So those are my thoughts on that. What do you think? Personal experiences with the Ruger LCP?

Monday, February 23, 2015

Ice Storm and Max Velociity Talks M855 Alternatives

Down here in Louisiana we are finally getting a shot of winter. It is cold (35 when I got  home) and there is an 80% chance of rain. School was canceled today and is also for tomorrow. We had a late call today and have a later one tomorrow. Paw Paw shared a picture that pretty much sums up the situation.

 Max Velocity talks alternatives to M855.  Putting my money where my mouth is that case of 55gr M193 5.56 I just ordered showed up today. I need to get a 50 cal ammo can to store it in. Also need one for that case of 7.62x39 I bought when the Ukraine really kicked off. I probably need to order about 4 ammo cans.

500 rounds of Remington 110gr SJHP for $250. Fifty cents a round for any .357 mag ammo is a good deal. For Remington hollow points it is a darn good deal.

500 rounds of Independence 55gr M193 for $164.99 (.33 a rd). With the nature of 5.56 right now this is a good deal. If you are short, or just want a few months of training ammo this is a good way to get squared away.

Sunday, February 15, 2015

More M855 Ban Stuff

MAC did a good video on the whole M855 situation. YOU NEED TO WRITE THE ATF AND YOUR ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES ABOUT THIS NOW!!
Peter noted that the panic is on for affordable bulk 5.56 like M193 (PMC X Tac M193 at Lucky Gunner $390/1k). His point that you shoulda stocked up awhile back is valid but not particularly productive. I suppose there is some value as a reminder but if a person is reading either of our sites that is probably common knowledge. It is also easier to say as an older guy who has been at this for awhile. Younger people and folks with families or tight budgets may have been meaning to do it and either not had sufficient funds or just hadn't gotten to it yet.

As noted I bought a case of  M193 yesterday, thankfully before the morning price bump. I had planned to get some 5.56 this year anyway and it seemed like the obvious time to do it. Looking back I wanted to get 2 cases but right now that is looking uncertain. I am not in a place where I need to pay silly prices, aside from maybe a box here or there just to sight in an optic or whatever.


Saturday, February 14, 2015

Valentines Day, 5.56 Ammo Run and Reader Question

Well today is Valentines Day. It was a pretty good on. We did normal stuff during most of the day. This evening I cooked up some Chicken Parmesan with noodles, salad, broccoli and french bread. In hindsight cooking an untried recipe that's pushing my skill level hard probably wasn't the smartest thing to do but it worked out well. Everyone enjoyed the meal.

Now that the kids are fed, bathed and in bed we're going to have a few drinks and watch a movie together. A nice quiet night.

On the downside the whole M855 thing has me pretty irritated.

My rifle likes M855 so I tried to get some from Lucky Gunner but they were sold out. Ended up with  a case of 55 grain 5.56 instead. Honestly I hate to incite a panic but there was plenty of M855 yesterday and probably this afternoon but now there is none to be had. A run seems to be on big time. I suspect more than a couple people had the same thought I did. (Note in 45 seconds by their live inventory LG sold 2 cases of 55gr 5.56). Well I wanted a case of training ammo for the next ban and it looks like I got one. Right now I am, at least once the newest purchase shows up, probably honestly at my happy number ratio in 5.56

Of course the panic is slipping into other bullet offerings in 5.56. Thankfully if you are not too picky about an exact offering there is plenty of 5.56 still available. I don't know what, if anything, is going to happen next but I'd say if you are short on whatever your SHTF goals are for 5.56, plan on buying more in the next year or shoot 5.56 regularly I'd buy enough to ride out at least a few rough months.

Looks like an end run of administrative actions, import regulations, etc all is being used instead of some sort of actual law which given the R's running the house and senate would be DOA. Aside from .22lr Firearmagedon is over and things have been good for awhile. I hope you didn't waste that time. Money is tight all over and there are bills to pay but I hope you have purchased, if not everything you want, at least everything you NEED.

To balance out my, buy all the 5.56 right now OMG tone earlier step back and take a look at your situation. If you are totally happy with your situation in that caliber then don't do anything crazy and spend a couple grand on ammo just because. What I am driving at is that if you own an AR/ Mini 14/ Sig 556 and are not happy with your ammo stash then you should look at doing something about that while it is still fairly affordable.

High Desert Livin asked

I recently traded a glock 26 plus 3 bills for for a colt magpul (total 850 out pocket). Now I have a psa complete lower that I'm not sure what to do with. I thought about dropping a bravo co. On top, but am unsure if a awesome upper on a so so lower makes any sense? 

My thoughts:  It really depends on what you are going for with the build, concept of use if you will. Since you mentioned BCM I presume the goal is not a budget build. As to the upper/ lower question let us go part by part through the lower.

-Lower receiver/ stripped. Any aluminum lower with normal specs is just fine. Unless we are talking about some BS Bob's Basement lower made from melted Busch can's they are all the same. Honestly as Chris noted 'the most important thing about a lower is the roll mark'. With a stripped lower folks mostly pay for a name to brag to their friends about. If you want to pay 4 bills for a Noveske instead of $45 for DPMS or Anderson Arms then by all means do so, it's your money, but don't trick yourself into thinking it's going to make the gun run any better.

-Lower Parts Kit. This is all the little springs and pins that make the gun work as well as the hammer and trigger. I would be more cautious here than with the actual lower itself. Wouldn't go lower than decent sporting brands like DPMS/ Stag/ CMMG/ Bushmaster. That being said it would be an uphill battle to convince me a Daniels Defense LPK (if they sell one) is vastly supperior to say a DPMS LPK.

Personally I have seen very few rifles get deadlined with lower receiver issues. The way the AR works there just isn't that much stress down there.  Sure a spring can wear out over time but that is part of life, not an inherent failure of the weapon.

Presuming mechanically sound parts the only exception to my 'an LPK is an LPK' is the trigger. If you are serious about accuracy, and capable of holding up your end, a good trigger matters a lot. There are a lot of ways this one can go from just getting a good match trigger from say Colt to a drop in upgrade like a Geissele trigger. If I was going to put any extra cash into a lower it would be into the trigger.

-Receiver Extension/ buffer tube. These are all basically the same. They come in mil spec and commercial but otherwise I think they are a common entity.

-Buffer and buffer spring. These matter but any decent one will do. DPMS/ CMMG/ etc are just fine. Actually where people get into trouble here is when they want to upgrade and get fancy messing with spring tension and buffer weight. I'm not a professional firearms builder or a mechanical engineer so I just buy mil spec buffers and buffer springs.

-Stock. These are easily replacable so get whatever one you like. They all work fine.

That lays out my thoughts on each individual part of the lower. As to your situation if you want a BCM upper I'd say get one. If you don't like the trigger in the lower you have then upgrade it. That's really the only part in the lower that is going to affect shootability. If you are somehow unhappy with the PSA internals for a hundred bucks or so you could upgrade the LPK to Rock River or Stag if you really want. The point is that letting a roll mark on the side of a common part built to standard specifications dictate the way you go with the rifle doesn't make too much sense to me.

There are a lot of smoking deals on uppers right now. A buddy mentioned seeing a complete COLT upper in Cheaper Than Dirt's newsletter for 5 and change. Since it would have a bolt, charging handle and hand guards, which a current BCM would not,  that is a darn good deal.

Anyway I wanted to

Friday, February 13, 2015

AR-15's, Ham Radio and Life

Alexander Wolfe bought himself a fancy new Bravo Company AR-15. We talked about this before and he was fortunate to pull the trigger before they stopped the free BCM bolt carrier with every upper special which ran for a pretty long time. He went with the lightweight barrel, while I chose the standard weight on my rifle, but for most civilian applications the difference is probably academic.

On the plus side for him our mutual advertiser Lucky Gunner hooked him up with some 5.56 ammo to zero/ test fire the new toy with.

Alex doesn't buy guns often so when he does it is usually well thought out and a significant event. The topic of optics came up. It looks like Alex is planning to upgrade. He mentioned the Aimpoint micro. There are a lot of really good scopes in that general price range. I tried to throw out the topic of low power variable scopes. For a do everything rifle a low powered variable with an illuminated reticle has a lot going for it. Best of all even if you run out of batteries you still have a day optic.My Burris MTAC is pretty darn nice. However I do find the 4x max a bit lower than I would like. As Alexander noted 1-6's are great but really expensive. Burris makes a 1.5-6x MTAC which I've heard good things about. Also Vortex recently put out their 1-6x Strike Eagle with a projected street price under 4 bills.

Am helping a friend do an AR build. They got a deal on a lower now we are looking for an LPK to put it together. The goal is to get a decent to good duty type rifle at a reasonable price so while not necessarily the cheapest gun out there it should be a lot of gun for the money. This means no derp tier 'Bubba's Basement Armory's rusted thrown together 2nds LPK' is out. Any recommendations? Any smoking deals going on right now?

I've decided to finally get off my duff and get moving on the ham radio thing. There is a club that meets once a month in a bigger town not so far from here. So to get a license I need to pass a test. Any recommendations on how to study? Good websites you have used?

Tonight I'm watching the new episode of The Walking Dead. On the downside instead of a parade I think tomorrow there will be a trip to the hospital as Walker seems to have an ear infection.

Do you all have any big plans this weekend?

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Random Thoughts and Stuff From The Web

I think I'm going to sell my Kahr CW9 and S&W 642. Going to simplify to my trusty Glock 19 and a little .380 probably a Ruger LCP. Honestly I realized awhile back I made a mistake with the Kahr and didn't want to admit it to myself or take the modest 10% write off to make a fairly convenient sale. The Kahr, while a fine weapon, just isn't different enough from the G19 to truly be distinguishable. Have yet to see a situation where I could carry the Kahr but could not pack, albeit with some clothing selection, my G19. For the rare situations where a very high level of discretion is needed the CW9 won't cut it and the 642 is just a touch too big.

Part of this effort is intentionally selling off intermediate options to force myself to do the right thing and carry the Glock 19. Also I want to free up some cash for other things. My intent is to carry the G19 almost all the time and the LCP when I genuinely can't make the 9 work.

Recently I mentioned the FBI switching to 9mm. Surprisingly there was not a huge blow back from folks. Maybe they knew that arguing the actual points the FBI threw out in their letter was an uphill battle. Anyway today I was reminded of something valid to the topic. I'm going to link to a video of CSM (RET) Kyle Lamb killing what looks to me to be a pretty big hog with one shot from a 9mm.

This goes to prove a couple of points. 1) All reasonable CCW calibers are similarly (in)effective. 2) Shot placement is absolutely king. If you can knock out the ten ring all day long with a Walther PPK in .380 (1k American Eagle .380 ammmo for $385) but can barely clip the 7 ring with an almightly .45 acp one could legitimately argue you should pack the .380.

Incidentally Lucky Gunner has 1050 rounds of blazer brass cased 9mm for $225 and 1k of PMC X-Tac M855 for $369. Both of those are smoking good deals I wish I had the cash to pick up today. All pimping of my loyal advertisers aside right now, aside from rimfire, the ammo and gun situation is damn good.

You can read my thoughts on how much ammo to stock here. Seriously these times are good, minus rimfire, for ammo and guns. We do not now what is going to happen in terms of war, legislation or economics. Buy from Lucky Gunner my longtime advertiser (mention you came from my blog) or somebody else, I really don't care much. The point is that, within reason, you need to get the ammo to defend yourself now, while it is still widely available and reasonably affordable. In plainer language buy ammo like you were ordering drinks 5 minutes before last call at the bar, because that may be the situation.

On a more random note I stumbled into the top 10 bad assed Tony Soprano scenes on youtube.Good times.


Friday, February 6, 2015

RE: Minuteman Cache Example Part 1 by Meister

Meister was nice enough to do a nice breakdown of one of his caches in a post. This is a pretty darn nice, well thought out set up. That bin plus 2 cases of MRE's and a pair of cami's is an awesome setup that doesn't take up too much space. I would say this setup could work very well as an 'Operational Cache'.

Inevitably after the round of back patting for a job well done comes some hopefully constructive criticism. I didn't see a knife listed in there. Maybe a knife was in there and I missed it but with a cache of this size I think some basic survival implements such as a knife, lighter, water container, compass and such. Some sort of a knife should be present. We could debate a folder or fixed blade or both but IMO this setup should have a knife. At lease you could include a cheap but decent knife like a $15 Mora Companion.

Depending on how kinetic of a situation you anticipate I might throw a touch more 5.56; though I'm not entirely sure how much 5.56 is in there. Another of those 150 round Federal 5.56 boxes would be awful handy, after all if you have to shoot a rifle past a mag you probably have to shoot a lot.

Minor criticism's aside this is an awesome setup I would like to emulate. May have to look at setting one of these up myself.

Thursday, February 5, 2015

Book Review: 299 Days Books 1 and 2

Today I am going to be discussing the book series 299 Days By Glen Tate . I will be discussing the first two books in this post. Really I think the line between them is artificial so for the rest of this discussion they will be treated as one book.

Overview: This series of 10 books follows a man named Grant Madsen, his wife, family and friends living in the PNW through a partial collapse. It starts with the main character’s youth then goes through his childhood through college. His childhood was in a rural town in coastal Washington. He learned lots of skills but it was pretty bad growing up poor with an abusive alcoholic father. From different things I have heard that roughly mirrors the authors childhood which is unfortunate and I feel for the guy.

In college the author meets a girl and falls in love with her. They end up getting married. He becomes a lawyer and she becomes a doctor. They get jobs and settle into a comfortable upper middle class to kind of rich type life. Some years go by and he becomes a fat comfortable suburban guy. He refers to this period as ‘the Docker years.’

At some point the conservative lawyer realizes our system is quite vulnerable and decides to start preparing. He does so without the knowledge of his wife. The main character continues preparing for bad times. He is stashing food and buys a gun. He ends up becoming a regular at a local gun shop and buys a decent stash of guns and plenty of ammunition for them. Eventually after getting close with some of those guys he ends up meeting a group of people who shoot regularly together. He becomes friends with them and ‘the team’ shoots together regularly. The team also gets some training and advice from ‘SF Ted’ a Special Forces soldier stationed at nearby Fort Lewis.

At some point in his preparedness journey the main character ends up basically having a cabin fall into his lap through an early inheritance. He purchases a small but nice cabin with an unfinished basement on the water in a small inlet on the Puget Sound. His cabin is about 45 minutes from town.
The collapse happened very slowly at first over a few years. It started with economic problems. Eventually the stock market crashed, debt ratings were downgraded and the government couldn’t borrow any more money. They actually had to make cuts. Not trimming growth by 2% or vague cuts in the future but actual tangible cuts now. The unions got pissed and so did people on various benefit programs. There were large protests. The economy went into a death spiral. States started having diverging outcomes. California got particularly ugly but Texas was managing some of the same issues with much better outcomes. As fuel became more expensive goods were not moving so stores became empty. That part was pretty standard but it stopped there, short of a full on collapse. Things were bad though the power stayed on and some businesses were still open. Overall I think this is a very realistic scenario.

Onto the usual format

The Good:
A very realistic scenario is laid out. In fact one could argue some of the things mentioned in the book are already happening. In fact I heard in an interview with the author he had to slightly change some parts of the book because events he talked about did in fact occur. In particular the author highlighted the different outcomes rural and urban areas as well as different states will face. This is extremely valid because a collapse would have very uneven outcomes in this regard.

The characters were very plausible. First of all their skills, finances and the percentage of income they put into preps is realistic. They did not have a Special Forces medic or a master machinist whose hobby was running an organic hobby farm. 30 year old couples are not buying 40 acres with a nice house and a barn in cash then somehow making 100k a year out in the hinter boonies. Second of all they are flawed, Grant Madsen is preparing in secret because his wife wants nothing to do with any of that, one guy is really fat, older people cannot quite perform like younger ones. People have feelings and emotions and tempers.

Stepping away from characters but staying along the lines of realism I think the characters levels of preparation were far more representative of the overall preparedness/ survivalist community than many other fiction books. In books it seems that people are either super prepared or just normal folks who might happen to have some useful items around. It’s like all survivalists have a years worth of food, lots of guns and all this other cool stuff. In reality many people’s preparations are uneven as their resources were spent in areas they enjoy the most. It is not uncommon to see guys with a few grand in guns n ammo but not a month worth of food or women with huge stocks of buckets full of food but no way to protect their selves (of course these are stereotypes’ and don’t apply to all).

Relationships are also portrayed realistically including the honest fact that some spouses are not on board.

Every survivalist fiction book has to balance putting out some meaningful lessons through the story with the risk of turning into a disjointed half nonfiction ‘how to’ book. In the worst of these I have seen several pages of various military survival manuals and or standard ‘100 items to survive’ or ‘food storage guidelines’ stuff put in word for word. This book did a good job of straddling the line by giving some good core points yet not letting it detract from the book or break up the story.

The Bad

There was cheesy use of words like ‘gunfighter’ and ‘military contractor’ to describe members of ‘the team.’ I found it a bit cheesy and tacticool. Maybe it is me being a military guy and being long over those sort of things but it just irked me.

The break between books one and two was pretty artificial. It is almost like the author was writing one big book and said ‘We’ll split it at page 350’ with little thought to a logical breaking point. As such a person would get a weird impression if they only read book one not like a cliff hanger per se but of the book just ending.

Every character in the book seemed far more worried about other people’s feelings than I think folks are in real life.

It concerns me a bit that the impression was given that somehow a bunch of guys who don't know what they are doing going out to the range and shooting a bunch somehow means they are trained. They referenced getting a bit of help from 'Special Forces Ted' but unless it was pretty organized I am uncomfortable saying that replaces quality training by someone like Max Velocity or another organized type class.

Coming back to the preps the characters in the book had made. I hesitate to critique this too hard because Glen Tate the author did what I think was an accurate and honest portrayal of many prepared folks. That being said there were some significant holes in their plans.

First almost nobody had body armor. The characters had ‘tactical vests’ though I’m not sure if they really meant the cheese vests of late 90’s and early 2000 vintage or plate carriers or chest rigs. Anyway if I recall only one character Bill ‘Pow” had any actual armor. These characters, especially ‘the team’ spent a bunch of money on guns, lots of gear and ammo cans full of 5.56, 9mm, 12 gauge and 7.62x39 but couldn’t drop a few bills on plates. Guys on ‘the team’ had spare rifles and a couple had expensive shotguns like Benelli’s. The thing is rifle plates are simply not that expensive any more. For $450 or so you can get a setof AR500 plates in a plate carrier. At that price point with a bit of planning they are solidly in a normal middle class guy’s budget.

Their lack of plates was inexcusable. To illustrate the point Grant had 2 AR's, 1 AK-47, 2 AK 74's, a Remington 870, 2 .40 Glocks, a .38, a .380 and a 10/22. For the cost of one redundant rifle or pistol he could have had plates.  The characters were also universally without night vision capability. Given the much higher price point of anything better than Gen I this hole is still understandable but a couple characters seem like people who might have that sort of gear.

Water filtration/ purification was only mentioned briefly, IIRC Grant purchased a Big Berkey at some point. There was no mention of water storage in the books.

The medical preps they made were quite light. In the book it was excused as Grant Madsen (the main character) ‘Didn’t know how to use that stuff so he didn’t buy it.’ The explanation made a lot of sense to me till I put that together with the fact that HIS WIFE IS AN ER DOCTOR! He could and should have stashed all sorts of stuff. That is one of the few situations where the ’32 piece Czech surplus Stainless Surgical kit’ from Sportsmens Guide actually makes sense.

The biggest single hole I identified was ‘the team’ showed up with basically no food. On one hand this is accurate as a lot of tactical (or tactical wanna be) folks aren’t really survivalists/ preppers so they would not store food. However not even having enough food for an ice storm or power outage is just silly. It also seems the group had no stored fuel (except 2x 5 gallon cans Grant stashed at the cabin) or and very few gas cans.

Overall impression: I enjoyed these books and think you will too. They definitely spurred some thoughts that might lead me down productive roads. I will review book 3 as soon as I get around to it.


Tuesday, February 3, 2015

From Around The Web

FBI switches to 9mm. They throw out all sorts of facts and data. Honestly if modern defensive ammunition like the 9mm Remington Golden Saber, is available 9mm, 40 S&W and .45acp offer terminal ballistics that are close to identical. Also 9mm holds more rounds and it's milder recoil means most people get faster second shots on target. Plus it is by far the most common semi auto pistol round in the US and the cheapest common centerfire round to practice with. Those last two are a big deal if .gov/.mil isn't footing the bill for your practice.

Bayou Renaissance Man makes a case for keeping larger caliber semi auto pistols.  Personally I say carry whatever you want. I really don't care. That being said own your choice and don't try to justify it with pseudo facts that, while arguablly relevant 40 years ago, make about as much factual sense today as your Grandpa who says Japanese cars are junk and to buy a good old reliable Chevy.

That being said my next Glock is almost surely going to be a .40S&W. The reason is that for the particular situation I plan to use that pistol in it is going to be surrounded by guys with .40's, mostly Glocks as well as a smattering of other manufacturers. So a .40S&W Glock makes sense for commonality. Since it is not a gun I will shoot a whole lot the Glock .40's occasional tendency to blow up is unlikely to be an issue.



Weapons Man makes an excellent case to why the M14's greatness is only in the mind of it's owners. The M14, Not Much For Fighting ( A Case Against The M14 Legend ). While I am ambivalent about the 'mighty .308 BATTLE RIFLE' argument the case for the M14 or it's subsequent spawn the M1A is particularly lacking.

Since I have poked, albeit with very well researched factually based articles, the almighty icons of the .40+ caliber pistol and the mighty M1A in 7.62/.308 about two thirds of the people reading this are probably mad. Everyone knows gun writers who had very meaningful experiences in the 40's, 50's and 60's liked the .45 and 7.62/.308. They wrote books and articles and were famous so that means their words were gold. Their names being famous and their words being well published means their experiences are really, really current and relevant right? There is clearly no way that  decades of massive technological innovations could possibly make the thoughts of Cooper, Keith and Jordan any less relevant than they were when first written. After all you are still driving a 1949 Chevy, sending letters and playing records right? The comments section should be fun.


Sunday, February 1, 2015

Randomness

Watched the Super Bowl. Was semi interested as the Seahawks were playing and it was a fine excuse to do nothing all day, have early cocktails on Sunday and appetizers for dinner. It was good till the end which sucked. Why would you pass on 3rd and 1? At least give the run a shot then go for the hail marry. Doubly so when you heck a beast of a power running back who could probably push a semi truck 1 measly yard. That sucked.

Looked at my blog stats and for some weird reason Trimming Things Down- EAA Bounty Hunter SS 12 Gauge Sold got a bunch of hits. Why I really don't know. Definitely glad I sold that shotgun. It just didn't make much sense as a practical weapon unless I was in a place (like most of Europe) where I couldn't have a pump shotgun. If that was the case I would have 3 or more double barrel shotguns with auto ejectors that worked and the most practical rifle I could own. Anyway....

For my foreseeable future I will confine the shotgun collection to various 870's and single shot New England/ H&R 12 gauges. That being said I am good to go on shotguns. Presuming things stay more or less normal I have, at least in pencil, planned my next 2 years gun purchases. This year I will build some sort of AR, buy some ammo and just maybe get another pistol (either a little .380 or another Glock to put away) or .22 rifle and of course ammo. Next year I would like to acquire some sort of semi auto mag fed .308 and whichever of the pistol or .22 rifle didn't get purchased this year. The only real exception I can see would be if a pretty good deal on an H&R singe shot or plane jane  Maverick 88/ Mossberg 500A fell into my lap.

The option I wanted to work for the Kahr was a bust. I did some thinking and realized the 642 was where my energy, along the deep concealment line of effort, needed to go. They are a very traditional deep concealment/ pocket carry handgun so it SHOULD work. Looking back at Alexander Wolfe's Snub Nose Round Up I decided to try a Safariland pocket holster. Also wanted to have a real quality IWB leather holster. Thankfully to help get this out of the conceptual phase I happened to have an amazon gift card. I figured why not. Those two holsters will show up soon enough. I really hope this will crack the code on my problem.

Something fell into my lap that I had to jump on. It was a smoking deal on for an ever so slightly used piece of professional grade hardware at 50-60% of retail price. Not sure exactly where that will land so I'm going to stay quiet about specifics. I had planned to purchase a case of .223/5.56 soon but that is going to get bumped down the road a couple months.

Last month I ran/ rucked 22 miles. That was not good. In February I want to focus on moving more, do better, and be closer to 35 or maybe 40 miles.

Anyway that is about all I can think of to talk about.




Thursday, January 22, 2015

Reflections on My 14.5in BCM Mid Length Carbine "Project AR"

Alexander Wolfe of T Blog is thinking about upgrading his AR-15 to a BCM upper. I started a comment at his place then decided it was going to turn into a post of it's own. I built a BCM 14.5in mid length a couple years back. It's a great rifle and I love it. Some reflections on the overall experience of setting up and using this rifle might help my buddy out, plus also everyone, myself included, loves to talk about their cool toys.

What worked out well:

-The choice of a BCM upper and bolt carrier group. It's great. BCM is IMO a producer of legitimate professional grade rifles on par with Colt. That being said they hit that mark without getting into the stratospherically expensive boutique semi custom range of Daniels Defense, Knight, Noveske and Larue with 2-3k plus price tags.

-Standard weight 14.5in barrel. I toyed with the lightweight barrel idea but decided against it after a couple very experienced people (former SOF NCO's) said to go with a standard weight. Upon reflection after a couple years with the gun I am glad I did it. I can shoot all day long in 100 degree temps without barrel heat being an issue. There are lots of places to shave weight on an AR but A) the barrel is not the place to do it and B) fundamentally it's a light rifle anyway.

As to length 14.5in is as short as you can get without  treading into the (now especially nebulous) AR pistol territory. This is good for moving in and around vehicles as well as structures. Before the barrel length and velocity argument starts our guys in Iraq and Afghanistan have killed enough bad guys out past 400m with M4's that, at least as far as this guy is concerned, any debate about this not being an effective fighting rifle is moot.

-Upgrading the muzzle device. Call it a flash hider, call it a comp, call it a break, whatever. There are a lot of really good options out there at a variety of price points. The BCM comps look good and come in at a wallet friendly price. The only reason I can see not to upgrade the muzzle device for a pinned/ welded barrel, where it is a lot harder to do it later, would be for a really budget conscious build.

What I have mixed feelings about:

-Mid length gas system. It's a bit softer but not like these things are shoulder busters anyway. It makes replacing parts a bit more complicated. I like it but from both the accessorizing and scavenging parts angles a standard carbine length has advantages. My half hearted current answer to this problem is that I'm keeping the one I have but do not plan to get another mid length system on a future rifle.

-Battlecomp. Don't get me wrong I like it a lot but it is worth noting my concept of use for this rifle was 'build it so I won't go back and do it again in a couple years' so budget was not a primary driver. Also looking back I'm not sure those funds wouldn't have been better spent going towards an upgraded trigger or a rail (we'll get to that). Then again I wanted the BCM comp but they were between versions or something so it was perpetually out of stock at the time.

What I'm not so sure about:

-Not buying a rail right away. I was trying to keep the price sane and the fixed front sight of a normal A2 style gas block appealed to me. That combined with a pinned receiver made putting a rail on it down the road a problem. Combining that with my rail preference (free floating and not a quad rail) made it a downright hassle. I ended up with a nice and surprisingly affordable free floating MIDWEST INDUSTRIES S S G/2BLACK 12rail but it was a big hassle that could have been easily avoided. 

To the specifics of Alexander's situation:
- You can't go wrong with a BCM build though I do recommend a standard weight barrel.

-If you choose to run with this plan I would build a whole rifle. The upper is at least 75% of the cost, more if you factor in rails, optics, lights, etc. Would you have two trucks and swap a set of rims and tires between them.

-I am solidly in the 'keep the old rifle for a rainy day' camp. Use the older cheaper rifle as a 'truck gun' or make an operational cache.

-As an outside of the box idea if the only thing that really bothers you about the current rifle is the carbine length handguard why now just change/ cut down the gas block then put on whatever length rail you want?

Don't get me wrong, the last thing I'm trying to do is talk him out of buying a great AR. I have a very similar rifle and love it. If there are other reasons, including just wanting something shinier, to purchase the new rifle then roll with it. However if the hand guard is the only problem with the current rifle that is an easy fix. Instead of being a several hundred dollar project it would be 2 or 3 bills.

Anyway I hope it helps Alexander with his project.

What do you all think?

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500 rounds of Brown Bear 7.62x39 for $109
An update on the MVT Shield from Max Velocity
Camping Survival has sandbags starting at 35 cents a piece going down to 27 in bulk
At LPC survival they have a Mountain House classic assortment on sale for $71.99

Monday, January 19, 2015

Weapons Caches and Random Thoughts Theiron

In reply to a recent post smart prepared guy and frequent commenter Meister, who I just learned has a blog, left a comment that I have been mulling over.

"An operational Cache is the only way to defeat the man when they come for your guns. If all you first tier weapons and gear is available to them, your later efforts will be hamstrung by crappy gear or inadequate weapons. Your Cache is as important, or more important than the gear you keep in your "minuteman load out""

I should note that we sort of covered this general topic in the post about my operational cache and RE:When They Come For Your Guns. That being said.

There are a lot of reasons you could want to have guns cached away. Your house might burn down or there could be a break in. The point is to avoid having all your eggs in one basket. Many things could happen in life and it is prudent to have options.

Of course we need to weigh the trade off of access vs security. To loosely quote John Mosby in the conversation where I asked to cross post his seminal post on caches "if you bury a gun you can't shoot someone in the face with it." Guns you rely on for defense or hunting should not be cached as a general matter of principle. If you have a small battery of guns that meets your basic needs there isn't much, if anything, left to cache. That is what it is. Down the road as you pick up additional weapons over time the ability to cache some will present itself.

Meister justifiably criticized stashing less than optimal weapons. His point that you should put as much, if not more, thought into the gear that gets cached as the stuff in your home defense/ minute man load out is valid. If nothing else should a problem arise with the M4agery sitting in my house I can dig up a new part from my stash or get one at a local shop; on the other hand if/ when I dig up a buried rifle I need it to be as reliable as humanly possible. I am taking this into some serious consideration for the future. That comment could also be a reply to my point that you can stash whatever sort of guns you have on hand. This discussion deserves it's own reply.

People with multiple (certainly 3+)  fighting rifles and multiple handguns can afford to put away good fighting weapons. On the other end of the spectrum these are hard times. Lots of people are sacrificing deeply and working extra hours to buy 1 AR-15/ AK and 1 good fighting pistol. Telling these folks they have to get another set  or two to be prepared is going to send them into overload; not to mention they need food storage, plenty of 5.56 or 7.62x39 and 9mm ammo and other stuff.

I have said to cache the guns you have on hand to cache and stand by that. If you have a $1,500 Daniels Defense AR and a $900 Sig to put away then do that but if all you've got is a dusty Marlin 30-30 and a .22 revolver then put them away in a cache. Buy a couple hundred rounds of ammo for the 30-30 and some ammo for the .22 and put it all away. I am not saying they are the best guns but if they are the best guns you have not to put away then run with it. I would sure rather have a 30-30 and a .22 revolver than nothing.

Coming back to my own personal situation. I cached what I had. My operational cache has a J frame .38 revolver which isn't exactly my ideal do everything handgun. I wish I could have put a full sized Glock in there but I didn't have one to spare. Maybe in the next couple years I will stash some sort of a Glock there. The ideal situation for that would be a Glock 22 with a 9mm Lone Wolf conversion barrel. Also wish I was able to stash a military sleep system or two there. We do the best we can and then try to do better later.

My intent is to spur people into action. The reason I am pushing this so hard is to get people out of the problem admiration phase and to get them to actually do something. It is great to think of a time in the future where stashing a spare of your favorite fighting rifle and pistol will be painless. Set up an operational cache with what you can put in it now. Down the road if your collection grows replace the guns you put away with fancier ones or even better keep the old cache where it is and set up another one with the new guns.  Again my intent is that if you can realistically set away a gun or two then do it, soon. Things can happen and it is prudent to get squared away sooner instead of later.

As to the guns you keep on hand one could always stash some of them if needed. Say you had a feeling some sort of confiscation was coming. In a minimal amount of time you could set up a hasty cache with some of the guns you have on hand. I do believe you would be prudent to have something left to confiscate. Maybe it is your couple papered guns or a revolver and a shotgun or Mosin. Just be sure to stash the ancillary stuff like ammo and mags for the guns you put away.

It is my personal opinion a survivalist could do well to set up as many caches as they can afford to set up, keep track of and have use for. Just beware not to go too far and short yourself in other areas such as food storage, paying off debt, setting aside tools and gear, etc.

So those are my thoughts on that. What do you think?

Friday, January 16, 2015

From Around The Web

Mike Pannone: Making an M4 run like a Gazelle


Hoss USMC went and set himself up an Operational Cache. Good stuff. I did this awhile back and it is a comforting thing to have done.Hoss also stashed the same chest rig I did. Like that thing a lot and might end up getting another one down the road.

Hoss stashed some pretty nice gear and was able to put away a Glock, which I couldn't at the time. Hopefully when I'm in my cache area next I'll be able to stash one there. Do not get discouraged and fail to cache because you do not have a surplus of cool new gear, put away the stuff you do have. Take a couple guns that are collecting dust and put em away. Get some ammo for them and ancillary stuff. Throw in some way to carry ammo and whatever spare field gear you've got and put it someplace outside of your home/ 'retreat'. Just do it.

In sad news for the gun community:
New ATF fiat declaration ruling on the Sig Arm Brace. Apparently that the second order effect of this 'brace' being a decent stock and many people using it as such has caught the eye of the ATF. Shoulder at your own risk.

In positive news for the gun community Magpul announced some new products:
AK accessories/ furniture
60rd AR drums that should be reasonably priced ($100ish) and actually work and best of all
Magpul Glock Mags!!! MSRP is just under $16 so street price SHOULD be in the $13ish range, which is what half of factory Glock mags cost. When they come out I'll definitely buy some.


From our friends at Lucky Gunner
250 rounds of Seller and Bellot #4 Buck for $119
Tula 9mm for $205/1k
Federal 5.56 XM193 $173/500


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