Showing posts with label S&W Model 19. Show all posts
Showing posts with label S&W Model 19. Show all posts

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Quote of the Day: Bill Jordan on Stashing Guns and Ammo For SHTF

He turned around to Bill and asked, “Mr. Jordan, what battle rifle would you stash away?”
Bill took another sip of his vodka tonic and said, “I’d put away a Smith & Wesson Model 19 and a box of cartridges.” Bill being from Louisiana, it came out sounding like “Kat-i-ges.”
Our local gun expert realized that Bill was a little hard of hearing, so he said, “No, Mr. Jordan, I meant what kind of AR would you want to have hidden away.”
Bill smiled, finished the vodka tonic, and said, “Sonny, I heard you the first time. And my answer is a Smith & Wesson Model 19 and a box of cartridges. If serious trouble starts and you can shoot at all, you can get whatever kind of little machine gun you’d want to carry. You could even get a little Jeep to drive and maybe even a nice looking uniform to wear… if you can shoot!”

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Book Review: No Second Place Winner by Bill Jordan

Today I am going to be reviewing the book No Second Place Winner by Bill Jordan.

This book is definitely old school written by one of the most preeminent western law men, pistol shooters and handgun authorities of his era. He spent 30 years on the border patrol, mostly as far as I can tell on the Texas border as well as fighting as a Marine in WWII and Korea. His shooting skills were legendary from wax bullet exhibitions drawing and point firing at asprin to a legitimate recorded .27 second draw and shot on target! Given that a one second draw to first shot is considered pretty good that is downright amazing. He was also the man behind the S&W Model 19 Combat Magnum which was the peak of the police/ fighting revolver.

This book is pretty short at 114 pages with a few thoughtful blank ones at the end for notes. There is a general opening followed by discussion on selection and maintenance of holsters, pistol grips, handguns, cartridges and bullets. After that it talks about the mechanics of the draw and how to work to build speed without losing accuracy (it's amazing how little some things change). After that it gets into some of the psychological stuff and a variety of different things then there is a summary and closing. Onto the usual format.

The Good: This book is short. At 110 pages I read it in about 2 hours. To say it is short is not an insult. It thoughtfully covered every topic necessary and left nothing out. There were enough 'no shit there he was' stories about cool old school lawmen/ gunfighters to be entertaining but so many as to bring the conversation off track or to add unnecessarily to the length of the work.

As noted before Bill Jordan probably sweated out more wisdom on the Texas border than most shooters, even competent instructors possess. Aside from being a tough guy in a tough place during a tough time some of the tangibles of his capabilities were downright amazing. Given that he lives to the era of shot timers and video cameras his feats carry a lot more weight of accuracy than those of an era where news was only passed by word of mouth and print.

So much of this work is still entirely relevant today. Granted the strictly technological stuff is dated, there isn't a way around that in a book that is 50 years old. Still a person outfitted with the gear described as optimal; a good wide gun belt, a stiff strong side leather holster, a double action 4" revolver with ergonomic grips and semi jacketed lead flat nose bullets could certainly do a whole lot worse. The setup he described is pretty much my perfect woods walking rig.

Gear talk aside so much of what was described is still so relevant.

I particularly enjoyed how Mr Jordan described the transition of different shooting techniques for different ranges. This is something I've thought about and practiced in the past. In short as distance increases you need more accuracy so there is a transition from speed to accuracy. It goes something like this.
0-3 yards- Draw and fire as soon as the gun comes level. Today we have reinvented this into a 'speed rock.This move is shown well in the beginning of the  Collateral 'Briefcase Scene'

3-7 yards. From the speed rock you extend the handgun and bring it out and a little up to get a better shot.
7-15 yards- The hands come together at stomach level.
15-25 meters- Traditional aimed fire at eye level.

So much more good stuff.

The Bad: Like anything that goes way deep into specific gear (vs concepts, etc) as time goes by it becomes dated. While I loves me some k frame S&W's that stuff is way out of date.

The Ugly: beautiful craftsmen quality fighting revolvers like the K Frame Model 19 .357 are no longer widely available and affordable for all but the lowest budgets in hardware and general stores.

Conclusion. You can take the gear stuff with a grain of salt though they represent the peak of the fighting revolver, well minus ammo. Today I'd choose a 158 grain JHP instead of the semi jacketed lead flat nose we tend to call a semi jacketed soft point today.  That being said I don't want to take either one to the chest.

Still gear aside the book has a ton to offer. Heck the 'there he was' stories and the amusing no longer politically correct outdated language is worth the price of the book for entertainment value alone. Seriously though this book has a ton of valuable tips and knowledge to offer. Also if you are so inclined a minute on google can find it in PDF.

Got bad assed old school gunfighter knowledge?

Sunday, November 3, 2013

Long Day Of DIY Plus Random Linkeage

My weekend evaporated into 2 home improvement projects. On the good side some stuff got done. We made legitimate, tangible progress on the two things that will really make our residence optimal.

Putting laminate flooring into one room stalled out yesterday. It was dinner time plus I needed materials so that was a pause. Got the stuff to move forward today.

However since that project just wasn't getting done in a day we decided to put up an interior french door instead. Somehow we missed that being a fairly complicated thing to do. Anyway it was a complete Charlie Foxtrot. Numerous google searches and 3, count them three, trips to the hardware store ensued. There were literally blood, sweat and tears. Thankfully we all came out alive and more or less intact.

It would be an exaggeration to call it an unmitigated disaster. Eventually the door did get up and I think it will work out quite well. Maybe it was a bit more like say, the British misadventure in the Falklands. A situation where something fairly easy got quite complicated, partially through self inflicted problems then ended up in a win eventually.

I have a post on DIY stuff coming up.

Since I spent all day breaking then trying to fix stuff my brain is fried so you will get linkage. 

This post on The Smith and Wesson Model 19: The Perfect Police Man's Revolver is excellent. The Magnum K frame was probably the peak of revolvers as combat handguns. The only real improvement would be a more corrosive resistant finish and the M19's cousin the M66 has that. I would not hesitate for a second to take a Model 19 into the woods or for that matter carry it in town. They are very accurate, rugged/ reliable within reason (ain't a Glock) and heavy. Heavy is good, heavy is reliable, if it doesn't work you can hit them with it. Seriously though a fringe benefit of steel revolvers (and 1911's) is that if a threat is up close you can just whip the hell out of them with the big piece of metal in your hand. Whack somebody in the noggin with an S&W Model 19 and the fight's probably over. Not so much with the (otherwise much desirable) polymer wonders.

It is true a K frame will not stand up to endless shooting with heavy .357magnum rounds. Folks who for whatever reason want to shoot 500 rounds of heavy .357 mag ammo a month should get the bigger N frame or a Ruger GP-100. However most revolver owners do not shoot that much .357 mag ammo so the issue is in my mind negligible.

A normal citizen or hunter, even a real shooter who (like most) tends to practice with .38 ball and occasionally a bit of 357 mag to test duty as well as afield/ duty could use a Model 19 for decades without metal stress issues on the forcing cone/ backstrap. They are great guns, an excellent combination of history, beauty and function. On the other hand, while I do not own one, I would lean towards a Ruger GP-100 for a rifle and backpack run to the hills scenario.

Max Velocity's post on Rhodesian Cover Shooting (The Drake Method) is worth reading and keeping in mind. Basically in scenarios where a group is taking fire from unknown locations or fears/ believes enemy is sneaking up every shooter will put a round or 2 into each piece of cover they think someone could be behind within their field of fire. It is worth noting that ethically this technique must be reserved solely for isolated or otherwise free fire areas.

I truly believe we are, as civilians or soldiers, accountable morally if not legally (which we almost always are) responsible for every round we fire. That being said if I am in a small unit moving through the middle of the woods/ desert and we get into contact, maneuver or whatever, then (if it is part of their TTP's) the enemy starts with harassing fire or is going to try to close into our lines I'd put 2 into the bush and 1 on each side of the tree. At the point where 2 or more armed groups have been shooting at each other for awhile the shepherd boy has run off, the shaking bush is probably a bad guy. The Rhodesia Cover shoot is not the answer for every problem but it is a good technique to have in your head just in case.

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