Showing posts with label dry fire. Show all posts
Showing posts with label dry fire. Show all posts

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Training and Dry Fire Thoughts

People can tend to over train in rarely used and unrealistic areas. Two examples would be speed reloads and rifle to pistol transitions. Statistically speaking in a civilian gunfight you won't shoot a .38 snobby dry let alone a modern double stack handgun holding 15 ish rounds. I won't say t never happens because sometimes it does but it's very rare.

Ditto rifle to pistol transitions. For that to make sense 3 things need to happen simultaneously. First a modern rifle which usually holds 30 rounds and certainly 20 plus needs to run empty (or jam which I didn't mention in pistols because if you use decent modern guns and aren't a complete buffoon it's very unlikely.). In a civilian or even law enforcement context rifle fights end really fast. The reason for this is that rifles stop people, even the much picked at 5.56, very well. Also critically rifles and shotguns are much easier to shoot well than pistols due to a longer length between songs and so many Points of contact. Second I would have to be at pistol range which we could define as 25 meters for simplicity. Third I would have to be in the open otherwise I'd just reload my rifle behind concealment/ cover. The idea of people blazing away at each other at pistol distances in the open until  I run dry won't happen outside an action movie.

These skills are good to know how to do. They are also good to practice. It's just a question of how much of our limited time should go to them. I would be inclined to mostly practice the stuff that will help me win the fight. The biggest single shooting skill there is getting the first hit on target. Shooting someone gets you all up in their OODA loop.

Dry fire training with a timer is essential to improvement in these skills. Unless you have a range outside your back porch and a huge ammo budget you can't shoot every day. You can do dry fire at home for free.

Today's notes.

Equipment. G19 and appendix holster.
Consistently hitting 1.5 from concealment. Dropped to 1.4 and ran 50/50 ish but get rushed and was making mistakes. I'll stick at 1.4 for at least a week. My short term goal is to get dry fire from concealment to 1.3 which giving a little extra time for real shooting get me at 1.4 there. The long term goal is sub 1 second from concealment but that's beyond a dream now.

After that I did a few rifle to pistol transitions to get ready for shooting this weekend. More on that topic later. 

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Thoughts on Self Improvement Part 2: Making it Stick then Upping the Tempo

Awhile back I talked about self improvement in a boringly titled post called Thoughts on Self Improvement. As I progress through some of my own self improvement I have been thinking more about the issue. Today I want to share those thoughts.

So we began action on the issue we want to improve. Generally speaking there are two ways we could do this.

We can totally modify the behavior all at once cold turkey. Stop drinking, stop smoking, stop eating crap, stop finding potential mates drunk at closing time, whatever. In some cases when the behavior is dangerous this is a good option. On the other hand in some cases stopping using substances cold turkey can actually be dangerous. Those are the extreme pro's and con's. In general I am against this approach because it is harder to stick with but sometimes you wake up and don't want to do something anymore and it sticks.

The other option is a more gradual approach. Instead of a heart attack in a bag every day get a turkey sandwich or salad 2x this week, next week do that 3, etc.

How do we make this progress meaningful? I believe we need to make our plan measurable.

Drink less beer is not a measurable plan. Drink 2 or fewer beers Sunday to Thursday and not more than 6 on Friday/ Sat is measurable. Work out isn't measurable. Exercise for 20 minutes 3 times a week is measurable. A measurable goal matters because that way you can know if you are succeeding or not.

Now we know if we are making the initial plan stick.

I should note that these are measures of performance not measures of effectiveness. These are not a long term answer because they are not performance rated. The weakness of measures of performance is you might not be measuring the right thing. You could exercise for 20 minutes 3 times a week (meeting the measure of performance) but not improve at all and thus fail your measures of effectiveness.

I like to start with measures of performance for three reasons.


Image courtesy of Kenny AKA Knuckle Dragging



First the primary goal early on is habit building.

Personal case in point. Leave was chaotic and I a only really getting back to dry fire practice this week. My goal was simple. Do 5 sessions of dry fire this week. No agenda, no time goals, no measures of effectiveness. Just do some dry fire most days of the week.

Why did I do it this way. My goal is just to get back into the habit of doing dry fire.

Second is that in the beginning of many self improvement areas or fitness/ skill building you will make progress right away so that isn't an issue.

Third in some cases you may not have a baseline from which to develop meaningful Measures of Effectiveness.

So how do we up the tempo?

It looks different for different things.

Lets take my dry fire. Next week I will probably do 10 minute sessions and use a shot timer. No real agenda and no par times. Just dry fire for 10 minutes 5 times using a timer. The week after that I will go to 15 and have a rough agenda. A week or two after that and I will probably have a program similar to something John Mosby would use. About that same time I will start keeping track of measures of effectiveness and setting short to mid term goals for them.

So those are my thoughts on how you can work towards self improvement. Get out and do it.

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Book Review: 299 Days Volume 4

 Today I will be reviewing Book 4 of the 299 days Series by Glen Tate
Warning, I can't really review this book without some spoilers
This book continues where volume 3 left off. In the very first part Grant is going on and on about the 'Patriot Republic' he wants to set up. Next they end up coming into possession of a semi truck full of food. This leads to a potential conflict with the government in the nearby small town.

There is a debate over what to do with the food. The community ends up voting and using a meal card system similar to the one described in 'One Second After'.

The next significant event in the book comes when they trade some weapons to the town leadership for medical supplies.

Like the series tends to do the book ends in a cliff hanger that starts the next book.

The Good:
This book had action/ conflict but it was realistic. Too often in survivalist books folks get in these crazy gunfights where one dude with his magical prepper skills and wiz bang 7000 rifle kills 20 bikers with AK's or something else similarly stupid.

Building on this after every significant event the characters learned some things through their own failures. We should have had/ done X came up often.

The community had people with a realistic range of perspectives on most things. Viewpoints differed and there was natural, plausible conflict. Everyone is not going to agree and despite what some idiots think, the answer is not to shoot everyone who disagrees with you.

In terms of setting up this 'Patriot Republic' Grant hammered home the point that providing services and meeting people's needs matter a whole lot more than arguing ideology. In many ways an insurgency is more a race to administer to peoples basic needs with an armed component than the other way around. This is for a couple reasons. First most people are pretty ambivalent about politics and government in general. The side that meets/ helps them meet/ creates an environment where they can meet their basic needs is probably the one they will gravitate towards. Like American elections it is the soft supporters and mushy middle folks whose swing decides insurgencies. Hard core socialists or die hard Patriots waving Galdstead Flags are not going to be swung to the other side in any big numbers. They can be marginalized, isolated, killed or forcibly migrated but convincing them to go with the other teams program is unlikely. Second actions speak a lot louder than words. Having a great idea is going to be less important than being able to provide an area with security, a predictable method for resolving disputes and maybe help with different things is what matters.

The Bad:
I think the level of independent government these folks were trying to set up was awful premature in relation to being only a couple weeks after the collapse. It did not in my opinion match with the (otherwise realistic) scenario within the book. I think this reaction would be a lot more reasonable after a few months of 'collapse' especially a soft collapse.

Also fundamentally they made a big mistake in saying 'Patriot Republic' instead of 'community'. "Our Community needs a way to resolve disputes" just sounds a lot better than "Let's set up a court for our patriot republic".

While the characters in the book acknowledged failures in hind sight they failed to pay any costs for these oversights/ failures. While they didn't need to kill off a bunch of random characters to prove their point but my experience is that more often than not we pay for tactical mistakes.

Why did Grant not say in more medical supplies? In an early book he said "he didn't know how to use them" BUT HIS DARN WIFE IS AN ER DOCTOR. He should have gotten all sorts of tools, sutures, etc.

The concept of controlling peoples movements in the book was not in my opinion acceptable. They had security which is great. However the non elected (though one could argue there was at least a loose consensus) leaders of this area deciding who gets to go out the gate to town or whatever, or for what reasons they get to go is simply not acceptable. I would not tolerate that and I do not think many freedom minded people would.

Also the author specifically mentioned he didn't want people going on 'vice runs' for booze, drugs or whatever. That the community needed to trade their valuables for food. I get the sentiment but that is not the choice of a non elected leader and that attitude has no place in a supposedly free area.

Ugly:

They traded some guns, mags and ammo to the local town, which is their self described enemy. We could get into a long discussion about the concept of trading weapons in some sort of a collapse. One fairly extreme view is that you should not trade any guns or ammo because they are useful to you and could potentially be used against you. I do not necessarily take this viewpoint. Say in some sort of a collapse a neighbor wants to get a pistol for their wife or older teenage kid. They have something pretty valuable I want and I have a redundant pistol gathering dust in the safe. Seems like an easy decision to me. On the other hand trading military rifles to someone I consider an enemy and believe I will have to fight at some point seems rather foolhardy.

Also the group formed an immigration group who get to decide WHAT PEOPLE ARE ALLOWED TO LIVE ON THE PRIVATE PROPERTY OF OTHERS! This is especially ironic because the main character brought out a bunch of friends with guns who are living, without the knowledge or permission of the owner, in another persons cabin! That he brought a bunch of folks in then was part of a decision that the community should control who else comes in seems ridiculous to me. This is not freedom, it is some sort of totalitarian form of government.

I get the sentiment, especially since they were really talking about gang bangers (though it did show a generational thing with tattoos). However I do not believe it would be appropriate to A) tell a person who can stay with them on their private property or B) pre judge people based on appearance. As far as I can recall in the book this issue never came up but the way they planned to deal with it is not in my opinion acceptable. If the Jones family brings in a person who causes trouble then the community has a right to get involved and maybe somewhere in the continuum of agreed upon consequences is banishment. The difference between the community getting involved after a person does something vs before in some sort of thought crime way is significant and the difference between a valid community function and totalitarianism.

There is a fair bit of bad and ugly in this book. I think this is disproportionate because most of the general good stuff from the series has already been well covered in other reviews. That being said no way around me significantly disagreeing with some of the things our little 'Patriot Republic' does during this book.

Overall impression: An enjoyable read with enough excitement to keep things moving but still be realistic. The parts I disagreed with did not retract from enjoying the book.

Edited to include:
PT: Speedruck of 3.25 with 35-40 pounds. Time 44:07 or a 13:30ish/1 mile pace.

Dry Fire: Gear- Glock 19 with Safariland 6125
Drill- 1 shot from concealment.
Par time- 1.5 seconds.
Extreme low- 1.04
Extreme high- 1.6 seconds
Average 1.1-1.4.

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

What Did You Do To Prepare This Week?

 Ordered another dozen mags for the FAL as well as the sight adjustment tool it needs.

Ordered a Dutch Oven which was long overdue.
Dry fire-
Gear- Glock 19 withBlade Tech AIWB holster.
Drill- 1 shot from concealment.
Par time- 1.7 seconds.
Extreme low- 1.3
Extreme high- 1.8 seconds
Average 1.35-1.55

This session was better than yesterdays. The overall average was down .05-.1 of a second but the extreme high was down more like 2 tenths of a second.

Oh yeah almost forgot WE GOT A CARGO TRAILER! More on this later. All in all between the FAL, spare parts kit, mags, the case of Federal 7.62x51 XM80 and the trailer this was the most expensive month of preparedness ever. Not intentional, just sort of how things worked out, but still a lot happened. Obviously most months are not like this. 

What did you do to prepare this week?

Monday, July 20, 2015

Be The Hero of Your Own Movie


PT this morning- Sprints. Not sure how many as I did not count. It's been awhile since I did sprints so it shook things up.
Dry fire-
Gear- Glock 19 withBlade Tech AIWB holster.
Drill- 1 shot from concealment.
Par time- 1.5 seconds.
Extreme low- 1.3
Extreme high- 2 seconds
Average 1.4-1.6.

Overall this session sucked. I really didn't feel good about it. Hopefully tomorrow will be better but at least I did it so that is something.

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

What Did You Do To Prepare This Week?

Over the last week or so I have....

-Bought a case of XM80 Federal .308 FMJ.

-Bought 100 rounds of .380 ammo.

-Rotated 10 gallons of gas. I promptly stabilized the new gas.

-Picked up some zip ties and rebar tie wire.

-Replaced various consumables, 3 cases of TP, some canned goods and the like.

-Learned to field strip the FAL. Man that is a simple weapon. I can see why it was so popular.

What is up for this week:

-Got to fix a better solution to protect my tomatoes.

-Mark the date/ fuel/ add in's for the cans I just rotated.

-Rotate some more gas.

-Be better about dry fire. Today was session 1 of the week and I want to hit at least 4x this week.

-Burn up some 7.62 NATO ball at paper and get the FAL zeroed.

-Confirm zero on another rifle.

-Do a short term grid down test run. Cook with non grid power, dust off the Berkey water filter and purify my water, utilize non grid communications, etc.

-Reengage working on the ham license.

-Probably order some silver.

-Probably order some more FAL mags.

-Maybe get some ammo cans and put away a bunch of ammo for the long term.

-Maybe go cargo trailer shopping. Then again I doubt that will happen unless the range trip falls through. They are both in nearby big towns in opposite directions. The trip to go shoot the FAL near Alex is going to burn most of weekend day. The other weekend day will probably be used to go to grocery shopping and do house keeping/ chores. Trailer shopping may be part of my fun weekend day (maybe hit Academy to look for .22lr, a nice meal out, etc) for the weekend after next.

Today's dry fire
Weapon- FN-FA
Drill- 1 rd from low ready
-Par Time- not established
-Average time window: roughly .68 to .99.
-Extreme low: .64.
-Extreme high: 1.13.

What did you do to prepare this week?

Saturday, July 4, 2015

Dry Fire Notes: From Concealment AIWB

Doing my dry fire when the kids nap (on non work days) seems to be a routine that works. I used the shot timer ap again. Unlike yesterday which was from my full fighting load setup today was from concealment. Appendix Inside Waistband (AIWB) with a Blade-Tech Holster Revolution Klipt Appendix IWB (Various models available)
I like a lot of Blade Tech stuff. They make good quality products at a very affordable price. Seriously they hit it out of the park on the quality to value equation. Their stuff shows you do not need to spend a ton of money on kydex holsters from some company that pays a former action guy to pimp their stuff.

Anyway I started with the par timer set at 2.3 seconds. That was more time than I needed. I was consistently in the 1.3-1.5 range with a couple outliers at 1.1 and really sucky.

It is interesting to me that the average times were almost the same as from a duty rig.

The duty rig got my fastest time to date (.87) but the time difference between the two (say 1.2 for the duty rig and 1.4 for concealment was a lot smaller than I thought it would be. I figured it would fall off the rails when I added clearing a cover garment but apparently it didn't. 

On the pro side of appendix carry the draw stroke is really short. Also it is closer to where you need the gun to be than behind the hip. With the appendix holster it has friction retention so there is not a device to engage before being able to draw. On the con side obviously it was FROM CONCEALMENT which necessitates clearing that garment. Trying to do that fast threw me for a loop a couple times in the first few draws. Also trying to focus on doing two intentional things quickly is going to take some getting used to.

For the next session I will set the par time at 1.6. My short term goal is to get consistently under 1.5 seconds. To achieve this goal I probably need to average under 1.4. I guess the long term goal is to be consistently under a second from either setup. I think at that point it may be pushing the point of diminishing returns on time required to maintain that level of proficiency.

For the live fire portion hits will be scored CSAT style on a  6x13 vital zone at 7 yards. Anything in the vital zone is a go though my preference is to stay in the top half of it. Paul Howe calls the top half (which roughly corresponds with the lungs and heart) the kill zone and the bottom half the 'colostomy bag' zone since it corresponds more with the upper part of the stomach.

One of the ways I plan to hold myself accountable and track improvement is by at least briefly talking about a days dry fire on here. Maybe posting some sort of basic data ( gear, drill(s) practiced, best time, par time and a rough average) in a brief post is the answer. I would include it as notes in the days post but that turns into a knowledge management nightmare.

I think I am going to push hard on frequency for dry fire. I tried 3x a week but that isn't enough to really make it a habit and defeat the enemy of laziness. So I am going to try 6-7x a week so I have to really have it as part of my routine. On the other side of the coin I am not going to push the time envelope or even really measure it. If I have a limited amount of time, say 8-10 minutes that is what I will use. If I have more time I will go till it stops being fun or I get burned out and times start to deteriorate. Down the road I will probably figure out an intentional program (I have a book John Mosby recommended on a shelf somewhere) but right now at least for a couple weeks my focus will be simply doing dry fire with a timer.

I am enjoying dry fire with a timer. It gives me a way to really measure how I am doing which is good. Also it is relaxing. I will probably start doing dry fire when I get home from work (on work days) to relax and transition into the evening. Also since it is free and can be done at home there really just isn't an excuse not to do it except laziness. It would be great to shoot a couple hundred rounds every day but aside from independently wealthy people (who probably do not have the time), sponsored shooters and SF/ JSOC types that is just not realistic.

Got dry fire?

Friday, July 3, 2015

Dry Fire with Shot Timer AP Trial Run

In a quiet moment I busted out the Glock and that new shot timer ap. Set it for a 4 second delay and a par time of 1.8 seconds. The drill I chose to practice on was one round from the holster. I was pleased with the results. My best single iteration was .87, there were quite a few in the .9-1.1 range though the overall average was probably 1.2. Clearly my iniitial par time was a bit slow. Next time I will go with 1.5. I was pleased that it turned out to be able to pick up the sound of dry fire.

Of course I did pay attention to doing things right and consistently. It is going to take me some time to get used to beginning to pull the trigger as I punch out from the high ready but I am sold on the concept.

Next weekend I will try to take it out to the range and run through some live drills.

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Dry Fire

Today I did my pistol dry fire like a good little wanna be Jedi. Realized I need to pick up some snap caps for practicing clearing malfunctions and reloads. Also sorely need a timer but that was a known issue and is going to be handled in a few days when I get paid and we do 'personal money.'

Beyond that I decided I'm going to try sticking with my current holster for awhile. I like that it can function without the thigh strap so if I was say rucking I could just wrap that part around the holster and have it off my leg. I also like, though it is a touch slower, that the SLS puts my thumb in the right position. I just keep it there and draw, the other hand falls into the right position, prep trigger, lock/ lock, front sight and press. Things are starting to get fluid and comfortable. Once I have a timer to measurably push speed we'll be cooking with gasoline.

Other than that no big thoughts. For safety procedures I clear my weapon, move to a different room that has a safe backstop and dry fire. I then leave the room (ending the session), reload and put my gun back in the safe. People either fundamentally mess up by failing to clear the gun in the first place, or more commonly reload thinking they will be done then go for just one more rep. This is where the psychological effect of a separate space matters with the back up of a safe direction ideally with backstop. A backstop could be a brick/ masonry wall or something improvised like a couple sand bags.

Dry fire is free, can be done in your home and if used properly will make your live fire training a whole lot more effective. You can dry fire to practice getting that first round on target fast as well as mechanical stuff like reloading and malfunction drills. Live fire is needed for recoil management, transitions, etc.

Previously I was a bit hesitant to further build bad or sub optimal habits but now that I have a solid foundation to build on it is game time.

I think I'm going to shoot for 4 sessions a week. Want to primarily work concealed pistol with some secondary emphasis on tactical pistol and carbine. Unsure how I should program that. 1 topic per each session or some mix and match. What do you think? What do you do?

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Just Do It!!!

This week we decided to get back to eating right as well as generally being healthy. We were moving out, then on the road then in a hotel at this end for awhile. That turned into a long weekend that was yummy but not especially healthy. I took Walker swimming the other day. Definitely crammed 20 pounds of Ryan into 15 pounds of suit. It was certainly a wake up call. So anyway now we are doing better.

I've gotten back into the gym as well as other exercise. Might just strap on the old ruck tomorrow. Again right now I'm probably figuring out a time schedule that is realistic plus a routine that fits my needs. There is a gym close to where I will be working so that is good. Also post has lots of pull up bars, ropes, dip bars and such for body weight stuff which is cool.

Also I started daily dry fire training. Nothing crazy really just establishing a habit, can fiddle with the programing later. Once spare mags and snap caps come out of storage that will help considerably. Do need to purchase a timer though.

The point of this is to stop being complacent and get yourself in gear. Start working to be the person you want to be. Just do it!!!

Monday, February 18, 2013

What Did You Do To Prepare This Week and EDC Contest Voting Begins

I ordered a Burris MTAC 1-4x scope and a La Rue mount to go with it. Hopefully they will get here in time to shoot this weekend. Did some dry fire practice and some decent PT though I failed to lift any weights because I am lazy and weak.

Set up a clothes line for Wifey and stashed enough stuff to do a couple more just in case. Got a few odds and ends of stuff to put in the pantry. Also I got a detachable carry handle/ A2 sight for a rifle. It's previous rear sight was lost or misplaced in one of the last many moves. Going to zero that suckers windage before painting it.

Finished reading Max Velocity's newest book Patriot Dawn: The Resistance Rises.

Also unrelated to my weeks preps as you can see by the widget on the right side of the blog voting has started for our super awesome EDC Contest. It is going to run for a week ending on Sunday. Any ties will be broken by me. If the results are totally shotgunned out so the first place is just a vote away from second, third is 2 votes behind, 4th 1 behind that and there are 20 other entries within a couple votes I reserve the right to use this round of voting as a run off. However I do not want or plan to do that.

Anyway please vote (once) for the entry you think is best. I will be reposting the EDC Contest Roll Up throughout the week so it stays easily accessible. Moving back to the topic at hand.

What did you do to prepare this week?

Friday, February 15, 2013

Dry Fire Practice- Little Things

This evening after putting Walker to bed I conducted some dry fire training. It was pretty good. Definitely getting used to handing the smaller J frame and it's trigger. One nice thing about a DAO revolver is that you cannot cheat and thumb cock it so you just have to get comfortable with the trigger. I am eager to get it out to the range and put some more ammo through it. This trip will coincide with zeroing the new scope for the AR after it arrives.

Did notice one interesting thing when shooting the wheel gun. My Blackhawk IWB holster came out with the gun a couple times. Admittedly it was probably just because I was repeatedly drawing without taking the time to really reset the holster. That consideration aside it is still no bueno. An easy fix is to undo the velcro on my rigger belt, slip the holster in and then re velcro the belt. The bottom of the plastic clip sort of looks like an upside down T that hooks on both sides of the belt keeping it solidly in place. I will probably talk more about this holster at some point. It's not perfect but for $10 picking one up when you get a gun then figuring out another option down the road when your budget allows (if you even feel the need to) is a solid option. Elitists will hate it but a $10 holster that is good enough for casual use or to get you started on a busget has some real value in the market place.

Next I shifted to rifle work. I haven't rocked iron's as primary sights for awhile and wanted to get used to using them in a CQB type setting. Also I needed to knock some dust off the old muscle memory. Rifle work was good. Weapon manipulation and target acquisition were solid. Also spent some time training with the tac light. With it located at about 1:30 the setup is pretty natural. The only minor issue is if I get lazy about grip my thumb can obscure the sights. Optics sit slightly higher so this should be less of an issue. If a bit more training will not fix this I will look at other mounting options or a pressure switch.

The point I am trying to get to is that we find flaws and weak points in our gear, systems and capabilities when we use them. Little things come up and we figure them out by setting stuff up differently or training appropriately. Occasionally something big pops up that must be dealt with. If you just buy a gun, a holster and a bunch of hollow points  then load up the gun and stick it in the holster to occasionally travel with you these flaws never appear. It is true that you may live a charmed life and never have these unknown flaws become huge problems but not everyone is so lucky.

Get out and use your stuff. Getting out and shooting is great but with the limited availability and high price of ammo these days it may be hard to do often. Dry fire is free and you can do it at home so there are no excuses.

Just Do It!

Monday, October 22, 2012

What Did You Do To Prepare This Week?

Aside from running, lifting and trying with moderate success to eat healthy most energy this week went to unpacking our place. I got the last of my crazy junk out the living room and into the right places this weekend which was good. Also dry fire practice continued.

We started stocking up on some emergency food in a small way with #10 of rice and beans, some peanut butter and a few of those small canisters of propane. We did some used stuff hunting where a wool blanket was found. A sweet new pistol mag pouch came home from the gun shop. 

Considering the amount of time that went into unpacking I am pretty happy with this week's progress.

A bit of tab clearing:
Massive Silver withdrawals from COMEX. Look folks, if you are purchasing gold or silver for inflation/ default protection it is essential that you take physical possession. The only circumstances I can see owning 'certificates' or 'metals stored in a vault' or 'precious metals ETF's' is if you are trading it as a commodity like copper or pork bellies or whatever. In that situation the costs associated with shipping, as well as buying and selling physical metals would really hurt your margins.

Overly Manly Man is a short coffee break's worth of entertainment.

Oleg Volk wrote a great post titled The Mid-Directed Fetish of Marksmanship.

Chris Costa of Magpul fame and lately Costa Ludis is putting out a zombie firearms training series called Operation Z. Got to like a guy who run's a gun like crazy, has a sense of humor and doesn't take himself too seriously.

Well it is time for me to make breakfast. Hope all of your Monday's are as good as they can be.

Sunday, October 14, 2012

What Did You Do To Prepare This Week?

Most of the past week was spent on real life stuff like getting settled here. Wifey and Walker flew down (to stay) and I picked them up yesterday. Very glad to have them here. Now we are furiously working on getting unpacked.

In terms of preparedness stuff the main thing is that I started doing regular dry fire practice. Had a few bucks lying around so I ordered Mike Seeklander's book "Your Competition Handgun Training Program", Starting Strength and a nice set of those impact sports electronic earmuffs.

Our scale came and I am pleased to say I am down a couple pounds.  It sucks but the saying that "you can't outrun the fork" is true. Drinking significantly less beer and eating better, both in terms of food choices and portions, seems to be working. Go figure.

Anyway that is what has been going on here. 




Thursday, October 11, 2012

Dry Fire Practice

I have started doing dry fire practice over the past few days. Definitely good stuff. I have figured out a few things and am getting my overall concealed carry system sorted out. While K over at Combat Studies Group has some interesting ideas to fill a few sessions I am sort of flying fast and loose without an overall plan. Suspect I will end up with something cyclical. Will figure it out soon enough; if I recall there is a good book on dry fire training on my Amazon wish list.

Need to figure out the shooting scene here. My goal is to conduct dry fire training not less than 6 days a week and live fire training monthly. Would like bi weekly better but I am not sure if that is realistic right now. Will have a better idea once I figure out the logistics of shooting here and some other stuff. Certainly monthly is realistic.

I discovered the TV show Longmire and it is pretty cool. A contemporary Western that has some of the good parts of those old shows without being a cheese throwback.

Anyway that stuff was all going on and all of a sudden I realized it was after midnight and I hadn't posted anything today. Now I'm off to bed.


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