Showing posts with label glock. Show all posts
Showing posts with label glock. Show all posts

Sunday, May 31, 2015

Range Report 5/31/2015

I took out the trusty Glock, the .22's and a buddies AR pistol.

The Glock recently got a Grip Force Adapter. It definitely goes a long way to making a famously not ergonomic pistol feel and point better. Not for small hands but otherwise I like it. Within the limits of the range I did what I could as they did not allow drawing from a holster or 'rapid fire' aka more than 1 round a second. Kept everything in the vital zone so that was good. So pretty much I did 50 rounds or so worth of of 1 shot from the high ready. Hindsight being 20/20 I should have shot some at 25 meters but oh well.

The .22's were fun as always. I haven't shot much .22 lately due to the ammo mess but I do have some set side specifically for training so figured why not.

The buddies AR pistol was good. Of course nobody wants to get into the questionable shouldering issue so we just shot it from the cheek. That handy little thing could certainly bring the pain out to say 150 meters. It would likely fit in a variety of fairly tall backpacks, tennis racket cases, etc to move around discretely. Also since it is technically a pistol you could say have it loaded in a vehicle or legally carry it in the type of bag previously mentioned. Not  a do everything piece but a pretty handy little PDW.

I really need to get my S together and buy a real full sized purpose made range bag. My little Blackhawk Sportster is good for taking a gun or two to the range but for bigger trips it is not sufficient. This was highlighted when I went to grab the gun oil and it turned out I had unintentionally brought scrubber/ degreaser instead when trying to throw things together at the last minute. If I had a bag the right size and kept that stuff ready to go it would not be an issue.

Furthermore I need to get a second set of electronic ear muffs to keep with the shooting stuff. I almost forgot to bring them today as they sit on top of the Sentry Safe Home Defender in the bedroom.

Woodburn is a very nice range with cool people. I always have a good time there.

Plus also shooting is fun.

Saturday, May 30, 2015

Reader Question: Glock 43 vs 17

I tried your contact button but it did not work.

My question is: I have some spare cash laying around and I can pick up a Glock 17 that I have spare parts and mags for, or I can get a Glock 43.  I am wondering if there is a significant difference between the two.  I realize the size thing and the 17 versus 6 thing.  I handled a 43 today and it felt top heavy without a loaded mag, much more so than a 42.  I currently have a S&W 638 and model 10 with a 2 inch barrel, a Keltec P3AT, and a Ruger 101. So I have smaller "deep carry" guns.  I am thinking the money would be better spent on a 17 as my son has one so then I would be looking at a two is one situation, this is why I have the spare parts and mags for the 17.  I carry a 1911 so carrying the 17 would not be a problem.

That or I say piss on it all and buy the Savage A17 that I really don't need but want, or is there something else out there I should consider?

Maybe you can make this into a blog post, I am not expecting a direct answer.


Ryan here: I'll check out the contact button thing. Onto the question.

I suppose it depends a lot on what you want the gun for. Do you want a different CCW pistol (it doesn't sound like you do) or do you want to stash another Glock in case S hits the F?

In general I am really underwhelmed with single stack 9mm's. Tried it and the whole thing just didn't really work all that well. .j    b b l;lThey are (most would say) too big for pocket carry.They are really not that much smaller (.89-.95 width vs 1.2ish) than double stack semi auto's but hold a lot fewer bullets. Also since the butt is necessarily uniform throughout they are harder to conceal than a J frame even if the dimensions are comparable. When people, as they almost universally do get an extended mag so they have more grip these guns are as long as a compact (G19) sized pistol. Personally I carry the Ruger LCP in and around my little sleepy town and the Glock 19 when I venture further, carry a lot of cash, etc.

As to the Glock 43 in general. For the sake of full disclosure I have little to no experience with this gun, can't remember if I've even fondled one or not. I think it is a bit expensive since there are so many competitive guns at lower prices (Kahr CW series, Ruger LC9, S&W Shield, etc). Still it has value because it should bring Glock reliability to a market with some questionable guns (Kel Tech, Diamondback, etc). With the concealed carry market booming and people loving Glock 9mm's I'm sure they will sell a bunch; this guy just isn't interested. I find that with a decent belt and pants bought 2 inches larger with a pistol in mind I can conceal a similarly sized double stack pistol as easily as a single stack. Until technology advances to the point where we are getting single stack 9mm's in the Walther PPK size range I don't see that opinion changing.

One of the biggest benefits about Glocks is that so many parts are inner changeable. For Glocks in 9mm and 40 S&W I believe the only size specific parts are barrel, slide, recoil spring and frame. This means my parts box for the G19 could probably fix a friends full sized .40 cal G22. Magazines are downwards compatible (a G26 can take 19 and 17 mags, a 19 can take 17 mags).

Paul Howe uses a Glock 26 for CCW and a G19 with a light for a duty type setup. Aside from G26 mags they both take all the same ammo, mags, parts, etc.  I don't mention that entirely from a fan boy perspective but A) it bears on this discussion and B) it's interesting to see the gear/ firearm choices really experienced people make.

As to .17 honestly I don't get it. I guess it can theoretically be a bit more accurate but if my 10/22 won't do the job I'll grab Project AR. Sort of along these lines I once looked at getting a .22 mag rifle and decided against it.

To your specific question I would go with the Glock 17 especially since you have a few small CCW type pistols. However to better answer the question I would consider a smaller Glock like a 19 or 26. I would lean to a G19 since your bench is pretty deep on small guns. That would give you compatability with the G17 and a slightly smaller gun that has a lot of bullets yet is realistic to conceal in anything less than a jacket.

So those are my thoughts on that. What do the readers think?

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

CSAT Tactical Pistol Operator Course Review

Today I am going to be reviewing a pistol course I recently attended. I went over to Combat Shooting and Tactics (CSAT) for their Tactical Pistol Operator Course.

The good:

A significant reason why I chose to train at CSAT was it's owner and primary instructor Paul Howe. Without overly 'tooting his horn' there is not anyone involved in modern tactical firearms instruction with a significantly better background to do what they do than Paul Howe. [Though he has a few peers such as Kyle Lamb, Pat McNamara, Larry Vickers and Frank Proctor, plus surely some Navy guys with similar credits.] He spent over a decade in a tier one Special Operations unit as an NCO. He was either doing bad things to bad people, or training others to do bad things to bad people for over a decade. When it comes to tactical weapon employment and self defense arguing anyone has much, if anything, on Paul Howe is an uphill battle.

This class starts with a brief introduction to firearms safety as well as the procedures they want you to use for clearing, loading, etc handguns. At this time the rules of the range and administrative considerations were discussed.

We also had a brief discussion of gear options with a focus on a tactical, assault type set up.
After the admin notes we had a period of instruction on drawing, gripping and firing a pistol. We then moved in to a drill based on the instruction.

The way the class worked is that we would come together for a period of instruction. After the period of instruction we would execute a drill. This broke pretty evenly into modules that were 45-50 minutes long. After a module we would reload magazines and ‘fluids in/ fluids out’ then move to the next module.

The class flowed in a logical, cumulative sequence. We took a break at lunch to eat then got back at it till about 4pm. The next day we got together at 8 and began again in the same format as the day before. It ended around 330 on Sunday.

I cannot necessarily recall every single drill or the flow of them but it all worked really well and built on itself. We trained on a variety of drills and the kneeling position.

Instructors were present and walked the line giving reminders and additional guidance as needed. They did a real good job of tempering this to the individual students experience level which varied widely. The DPS SRT member was on a different level than the eager, but decidedly new to guns, couple from San Francisco.

Day 1 ended with shooting some standards and being videotaped.

Day 2 began with watching the video from the end of Day 1. Being able to watch ourselves was a valuable visual of our shortcomings. Reminders were given. Following that we discussed some tactical issues and went over some real world shooting cases. Additionally we had a discussion about concealed carry gear, rifles and active shooter type bags.

After building fundamentals on day 1 we moved into different scenarios for day 2. First we worked on moving with hot weapons around people and shooting for precision in a hostage scenario. Next moved around/ between and shot from vehicles. After vehicles we worked on point of aim on a target wearing a t shirt and shot standards. After that we shot from behind barriers. The class culminated with us shooting the CSAT instructor standards to receive a score which can be used as a reference point for the future.

Specific take aways. Way too many to mention.

Draw to high ready and firing was trained. It was in line with the modern isosoles method but not strictly speaking a ‘4 step draw’. Paul said the reason for this is a fixation on sub steps (between holster and shooting) leads to artificial stops in the middle. This lead to a draw with the hands coming together at the high ready then pressing out fast into position, prepping the trigger while extending the arms, and shooting once you get the front sight. The result was a smooth movement that was natural.

Draws started from what Paul calls ‘interview stance’ in a natural athletic position with your hands together at roughly chest level. The reason for this is it’s a good universal position for a potentially violent situation. You can fight with hands, block, etc from there.

From other life experiences this is a good compromise between some sort of fighting stance which is aggressive and can be seen mistakenly by witnesses and being ready to get clobbered with your hands at your sides. In the past I have used the open hands towards people stance but Paul’s option is just fine. Really the difference between a fighting stance and these other stances is fists being closed and slightly higher. Either way the point to have your hands up and ready to react is significant.
Natural point of aim was a big point of the class. Going from a natural athletic type stance such as ‘interview’ through your draw should put the front sight on target at pistol fighting ranges. We still used sights but the goal is through proper mechanics that when you make the decision to shoot and your pistol leaves the high ready it lands on target.

Since we decide to shoot when leaving the high ready the trigger is being prepped from that point to full extension where you shoot. This movement is quite fast. The goal was under 1 second to hit a 6X13 vital zone at 7 yards. I achieved this goal albeit dead on with no margin for error.
The point to do things consistently was significant in the class. Example, every time you work the slide on a pistol grab it overhand. I was definitely guilty of using a ‘pinch’ technique for administrative stuff in the past so this was a point of improvement for me. The point of this is to be consistent across the board.

Dove tailing from that point the key that shooting is really all about consistence was pressed.
Both in the course of instruction and on the spot corrections to shooters Paul made a big point of only adjusting one thing at a time. I believe in the course of instruction the reason for this is to isolate a variable and guide shooters to the right answer FOR THAT VARIABLE. Over the course of instruction we worked through these in a logical sequence to end up in about as good of a place as a person can get in 2 days. For on the spot corrections Paul did the same thing. The reason was that a person can only really focus on changing one or maybe two things at a time.

The importance of automatically re acquiring your site picture after a shot was made. The reason for this is that it saves the time of doing so and thus speeds up the follow up shot if needed.
In a tactical sense we discussed managing encounters. The basics being awareness, verbal engagement [“I don’t want to talk with you today. Get away from me, do it now” doesn’t leave much room for ambiguity. If somebody ignores that they are deaf or planning something bad.], the use of objects such as vehicles or gas pumps to create space and such. This also lead to some interesting discussion on use of force with currently serving LEOs in the room.

Use of force is a really complicated discussion and I would not hesitate to give any form of legal advice. That being said one might want to look at how their state treats civilians in use of force scenarios. In say Texas the odds are a person who acts reasonably is going to be OK, not so much in California. Just another thing to think about.

So much more stuff than I could remember. Honestly it was 2 days of drinking from a fire hose.
The Bad: I wasn’t able to take this class last year. Was signed up but work messed it up. Something came up and it was going to be OK, just narrowly. Our schedule was delayed 3 days out (from the class) and I was stuck in the Middle East. Paul said no big deal and cut me a full refund. A year later it worked out for me to take the class.

The Ugly: I didn’t take this class a decade ago.

Pistols- The class was probably 40% Glock, 30% M&P, 15% Sig and the rest were a mix of different pistols (a couple of those new H&K’s and I think some sort of new Walther.) Two of the SIGs were duty guns for Texas LEO’s and the other was a guy from San Francisco. He had a real hard time managing the DA first shot on that gun. Darn near pulled every one of them. He is going to buy a Glock.

Most folks shot compact or full sized handguns. A couple guys had subcompact Glocks. One swapped out in favor of his G19 and the other has a young guy (like under 18) who shot Dads Glock 30S the whole time. His had was pretty darn sore. Most guns were in 9mm, there were quite a few .40’s, about 3 .45’s and one guy using the Texas DPS issued Sig in .357 SIG.

Most shooters were using some sort of OWB kydex belt holster. A few like me had drop type rigs. The LEO’s were wearing their Batman Belts with Safariland holsters.
I used a TT Duty Belt, my Safariland 6125 with a ghetto rigged leg strap, and a TT double mag pouch. Would have used my HSGI rig but I wanted to keep it simple. From here on out I will practice mostly with the HSGI Costa Leg Rig.

Planned Gear Changes:
Pistol- Grip force adapter to let me get a slightly higher grip and have more surface area on the gun.
Gear- I could use a couple inch longer leg strap for the Safariland. Otherwise I think I’ll stick with that rig for awhile and see how it goes. I need some of those belt keepers to keep my inner belt and duty belt together, especially if I’ll be wearing it for awhile.
Conclusion: The class rocked and I strongly recommend it.

Thursday, May 7, 2015

Glock Magazine Sleeves, Economics and Other Things

Something that came up in class was that the G19 grip is a bit short, not too short to shoot, just a little short to get my hand on fast on the draw. I used another guys G17 for a bit and I got a faster, more positive, grip on the gun. Since I'm using it with a light in a drop holster bulk isn't an issue. Still I do not want to lose the versatility of the G19. I am thinking about using a G17 mag and getting one of those magazine sleeve things. Have any of you used one? If so what do you think of them?

Bayou Renaissance Man talks economics. All news is bad. We are living in a false economy.

Turns out that first run of Magpul Gl9 mags wasn't quite ready for prime time. However being a good company Magpul is making good on them with a strait swap out. I'll still wait a couple months before picking up some.

I need to get a shot timer. The CED 7000 came highly recommended. Thoughts?

I had wanted to get a case of 5.56 ammo but my short to mid term goals have changed some. I want to set my glock up right with a grip force adapter, get a shot timer, upgrade my appendix CCW holster and a couple other little things. Some parts of my system have been proven worthy but others are left wanting. Additionally I want to save up for another class in the fall. Using this resource (CSAT) to the fullest while I am relatively local just makes sense. I would have a hard time paying to fly in, getting a rental car and going to a course.

The honest truth is I am far more likely to get in a fight with a pistol than a rifle, period. Also I am infinitely more likely to get in a pistol fight than run through my dozen or so loaded rifle mags, let alone need case of ammo X.

Listening to the beginning of 299 days again I got a good reminder to focus on what I can control. I can't stop a hurricane but I can have a Honda EU2000 with 25 gallons of treated gas (aside from other stores), plenty of food and a chain saw. I can't fix our economy but I can put back food and buy a little silver and gold from the metals pimp. I can't stop illegal immigrant criminals or meth heads or Daesh/ ISIS inspired terrorists from doing their thing but I can regularly carry a concealed handgun and work hard to be capable with it.

What I am getting at is that you need to quit worrying too much about things you can not control and focus more on how you can control the effects of things coming down the pike.

Monday, March 9, 2015

My Go To 3 Guns For The Walking Dead

Want to do something fun today. The Walking Dead is back on. They are in the almost boringly predictable scenario of a safe situation that is just a little too good to be true with hints of how it could go bad. Also Rick shaved his beard and has taken a practical, if not very humanistic, stance on looking after his group or just maybe is losing his shit. Time will tell. Anyway I've been thinking about what my top 3 guns for the Zombie Apocalypse a la Walking Dead would be.

AK-47 with fixed wood stock. Don't especially care what model though a good one would be nice and a chrome lined barrel would be good too. I do not want to get deep into the AK vs AR discussion. They both have a lot to offer and some marginal up sides over each other. The things that really put the AK above the AR, for this very specific scenario, is that it's capacity to use as a bludgeon to kill those darn Zombies is much better than the AR. Yes you  can butt stroke someone with an AR but you could bash in Walker skulls all day long with an AK with a fixed wood stock! Also they are more durable and physically rugged than AR's, if by a small margin, and close to comparable in terms of the amount of mags n ammo floating around to scavenge.

Glock 19/17 with threaded barrel and silencer. Mod's don't really matter but if I had the options it would have supressor sized  night sights, a stainless steel guide rod and a 3.5lb trigger connector. I would choose the Glock because they are super durable and probably the most common caliber/ platform out there.

Bolt action rifle with iron sights and a good scope in a flat shooting caliber. Due to commonality .308 would probably be the way I would go and one of the new Savage rifles like their Hog Hunter or Scout would be great but any old common bolt gun in .308/ '06 is just fine too. The goal of this would be reaching out and touching someone at 200+ yards with a fair element of precision.

The caveat to this is if I was able to really use one a bow (non compound variety) that would be a great option. One of those plain fiberglass 40ish pound recurve bows you see at garage sales all the time.

Busse TGLB sage with tan micarta grips. All the coolness of Daryl Dixon but with an easier to maintain finish

What are your walking dead guns?

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

From Around The Web

FBI switches to 9mm. They throw out all sorts of facts and data. Honestly if modern defensive ammunition like the 9mm Remington Golden Saber, is available 9mm, 40 S&W and .45acp offer terminal ballistics that are close to identical. Also 9mm holds more rounds and it's milder recoil means most people get faster second shots on target. Plus it is by far the most common semi auto pistol round in the US and the cheapest common centerfire round to practice with. Those last two are a big deal if .gov/.mil isn't footing the bill for your practice.

Bayou Renaissance Man makes a case for keeping larger caliber semi auto pistols.  Personally I say carry whatever you want. I really don't care. That being said own your choice and don't try to justify it with pseudo facts that, while arguablly relevant 40 years ago, make about as much factual sense today as your Grandpa who says Japanese cars are junk and to buy a good old reliable Chevy.

That being said my next Glock is almost surely going to be a .40S&W. The reason is that for the particular situation I plan to use that pistol in it is going to be surrounded by guys with .40's, mostly Glocks as well as a smattering of other manufacturers. So a .40S&W Glock makes sense for commonality. Since it is not a gun I will shoot a whole lot the Glock .40's occasional tendency to blow up is unlikely to be an issue.

Weapons Man makes an excellent case to why the M14's greatness is only in the mind of it's owners. The M14, Not Much For Fighting ( A Case Against The M14 Legend ). While I am ambivalent about the 'mighty .308 BATTLE RIFLE' argument the case for the M14 or it's subsequent spawn the M1A is particularly lacking.

Since I have poked, albeit with very well researched factually based articles, the almighty icons of the .40+ caliber pistol and the mighty M1A in 7.62/.308 about two thirds of the people reading this are probably mad. Everyone knows gun writers who had very meaningful experiences in the 40's, 50's and 60's liked the .45 and 7.62/.308. They wrote books and articles and were famous so that means their words were gold. Their names being famous and their words being well published means their experiences are really, really current and relevant right? There is clearly no way that  decades of massive technological innovations could possibly make the thoughts of Cooper, Keith and Jordan any less relevant than they were when first written. After all you are still driving a 1949 Chevy, sending letters and playing records right? The comments section should be fun.

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Random Thoughts

Today I spent some time reading about Operation Gladio the NATO stay behind plan for a USSR invasion of Europe. The plans and logistics alone deserve significant study. The actions of the stay behind forces in all manner of political shenanigans range from quite interesting to complete conspiracy fodder.

That lead to thinking about caches. Always more work that could be done there. Some I could probably do now and some for that mythical future time when resources are available. It also brought up the point of commo. You really need to set those sort of plans up in advance to have a decent chance of them working. If there are people you want to talk to it would be prudent to get those plans set up sooner instead of later.

Also it seems the younger chickens are starting to lay as our egg production is definitely up. That is good. We are getting a lot closer to producing what we use or at least a good percentage of it which makes me happy.

Gas prices dropping is an interesting development. Turns out the Saudi's and majority of OPEC must want to hurt Iran and Russia enough to take the short to mid term hit. The extra cash going back into the family budget is sure nice though. 

Between baby sitting two kids and a baby this weekend and Walker getting sick we are pretty beat.

John Mosby's second book is written. He is currently selling E Books and a physical book will follow and the E Book (for the very reasonable price of $15) will not be offered again. This book is more about the underground, logistics and living in a collapse type situation. I am psyched for the physical book to come out.

Max Velocity is offering $100 off his January Combat Team Tactics class.

The folks at Lucky Gunner did a pretty interesting review on the Glock 42. Personally if I were to get a .380 it would be of the tiny pocket variety (Ruger LCP, etc) .380 and if I went bigger it would be a Walther PPK but I can see how this gun might fit some needs. I can't wait for Glock to make a single stack 9mm and will likely sell my Kahr when they do.

If I had the jingle left in my pockets I would purchase  308 - 147 gr FMJ-BT - PMC - 500 Rounds for $335.
James Yeager did a video titled 'Ballistic Baller on a Budget'. He looked at two guns for under a grand My choice in that scenario would be a Yugo PAP M-70 and an S&W SDVE-9. Taking those two guns home for under a grand would be quite reasonable and a solid combo. Between the CZ-75/ Cannic and the M-70/ SDVE 9 choices it's 6 of one and a half dozen of the other though my choices offer better spare parts availability. Anyway that is what's floating around in my head today.

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Link Dump

AK PMAGs coming to a distributor near you. I can't wait to order up a dozen. Reliable, quality, reasonably prices polymer mags will sell like hot cakes.

Gun ownership is on the rise.

New York Cops call "Knock Out Game" harassment not assault. Well that is unless you are white at which point it is a hate crime.

R Lee Ermey and Iraq Vet 888 talk the new Glock 41 and 42. Between them and Massad Ayoob folks are saying good things about the G42. It may get some legs but I think price is going to be an issue if it comes in around the usual Glock tab. Is it better than an S&W Bodyguard or Ruger LCP, probably but a couple hundred dollars better I am not so sure.

The longslide G42 .45 will probably find a modest following as a competition gun. An LEO or open carry type civilian who is packing a G21 now might as well go for a longer slide radius. I don't think many folks are CCWing a G21 now and the standard sized Glock is a bit short for a full sized Duty gun anyway.

Saturday, August 3, 2013

Traveling Guns n Gear

Did some thinking. It's going to be a folding stock AK and a pair of semi automatic pistols for me. Both pistols are Glock 9mm's; one large and one small. Wifey's .38 will be handy also.

The AK was chosen because it's folding stock makes the rifle as short as it can be without morphing into an SBR or a bullpup. Since I bought years ago when basic AK's were reasonably priced I'm far more comfortable with the risk of it getting stolen than Project AR.

[This brings us to a teachable moment. The particular AK in question has a pretty spotty reputation and at least in terms of fit and finish is very close to the bottom of the AK barrel. This brings us to an interesting point. Some guns have spotty reputations and generally they are well earned. That being said the rate of systemic issues/ lemons doesn't matter if your gun has been tested and works. Careful inspection and if possible test firing are probably smart in this scenario. ]

For gear it will be the Miami Classic for the big Glock, a pocket holster for the smaller one and a Costa Leg Rig for a load out. Also tossed in a leather OWB holster for the small one just to have another option. To fill them and the guns it will be about 6 pistol mags and 3 rifle mags. I wouldn't have that many pistol mags but the shoulder holster holds 2 and the leg rig holds 3 (or 2 and a knife/ light/etc).

For knives I'll be carrying my benchmade and a spyderco folder in my off hand back pocket. Have been toying with replacing the folder with a small fixed blade of some sort. Realistically getting a folding knife, even a spyderco with that big hole, open in fight with my off hand is an iffy proposition. I have a push knife but it is a bit too big and they run afoul of knife laws in many areas. Lots of folks seem to like the Ka Bar TDI, I find them awkward. The CRKT Bear Claw has always seemed like it would fit that role well. Then again Cold Steel makes a shorter push knife with only 1 edge which generally makes the legal issue easier.

Aside from lots of organizing and packing life's normal stuff that is what I'm looking at taking for the trip. Hope it interests somebody. If anyone has questions, input or suggestions they are welcome. 

Saturday, June 8, 2013

5 Guns

It's well past midnight but I'm still rocking gun porn Friday. The 5 gun topic came up and I feel like chiming in. To make things a bit interesting I will do our family (Wifey and I, kids aren't near age yet) setup then what a hypothetical bachelor setup would be.

Family. Sort of like we talked about before Glock 19, AR, .22, Wifey's .38 and a Remington 870 12 gauge. With that setup I/we can hunt pretty much anything in North America (.223 can kill deer sized game an 12 gauge slugs will kill anything albeit at limited ranges), and defend ourselves.

In a hypothetical batchelor scenario Wifey's .38 would be swapped out for a Glock 26. The rest of the setup G19, .22, Rem 870 and AR would stay the same.

That's my .02 on that.

Saturday, May 25, 2013

Running a Glock With a Broken Trigger Spring

Interesting stuff. I shoot that way already to minimize finger fudgery pulling the gun off targer. Good stuff to know all the same.

Letter Re: Checking Your Handguns for Feeding Problems: Round Nose Versus Hollow Points

This chain Checking Your Handguns for Feeding Problems: Round Nose Versus Hollow Points, re, re has gone on long enough and got off track enough that I have to weigh in. In no way am I disparaging Jim Rawles or his excellent blog. Jim has been a friend to me and this blog. I read his excellent blog daily. When you accept guest posts inevitably some will be a bit off track. 

To briefly recap a guy has a pair of Taurus pistols (a .45 Millemium Pro and a  TCP .380)and prudently, though a bit late, decides to actually try shooting his chosen defensive ammo out of them. Go figure both of them failed to feed multiple times within a few rounds.

The first reply is from one guy who goes into the history of care and feeding on 1911's (don't worry we will get there in a minute) and rambled about how hollow point ammunition is just a marketing gimmick. The second reply is from some guy who suggests using a dremel to polish the feed ramp of your pistol to improve feeding.

Onto my thoughts in no particular order:

1) Go figure a couple of new unproven designs by a notoriously mediocre company with spotty quality control had issues. Taurus revolvers are generally servicable but newly designed auto's probably aren't a good idea. (Though I have heard good things about their 1911's) Seriously this is like Lou Gehrig dying of Lou Gehrig's disease, how the hell did he not see it coming.

Weapons you are going to use to defend yourself and family (vs hunting, plinking, fun, etc) absolutely need to be built to a professional standard. They need to be able to be shot a lot and feed anything. Glock, Sig, HK, Smith and Wesson (M&P and revolvers), Springfield (specifically the XD), Beretta and Ruger all build guns to a professional standard. It would be an uphill battle to convince me there is a Taurus (specifically their automatics) or a Kel Tech that meets such a standard.

I'm not saying you have to spend a ton of money on a gun. We all have competing priorities and budgets. If you aren't willing to save another C note for a Glock/ M&P get a basic gun like a good used revolver instead of some POS automatic.

2) To further elaborate a fighting pistol needs to feed all ammunition put into it. We can break feeding issues down by broad gun type. In order older guns, pieces of junk and 1911's.

2A) Older guns. The older military surplus and pattern guns (WWII through the 1970's give or take) were designed to shoot ball ammo either FMJ or strait up lead round nose. I do not fault these guns for that. It was the ammunition used at the time so it just makes sense. With these guns IMO you have two valid options. The first is to just shoot ball ammo. A good friend of this blog (though lately absent) who is big into surplus guns and has quite an enviable collection does this. He often swaps through various high power's of different makes and it would be cost prohibitive and impractical to test and keep track of which gun feeds what ammo. So he just shoots ball in them. I'm not in love with this option but for some folks it makes sense.

The other option is to get your gun worked over by a qualified gunsmith who specializes in your particular type of gun. Send your high power to a high power guy, your older surplus 1911 to a 1911 guy, etc. This can be cost prohibitive. Unless there is some compelling reason you want to carry that particular gun it might be better to buy a modern pistol of professional grade.

2B) Pieces of Junk. Yes, I am saying that currently produced pistols which do not reliably feed modern defensive ammunition are pieces of junk. Do not buy a piece of junk for defensive purposes. Expecting a piece of junk to work when you need it is just not realistic. You wouldn't get upset when $10 Soldiers Choice scotch doesn't taste like Ballantine's let alone Glenlivet. Why should guns be any different? I am on the record as being in favor of quality used guns instead of new lower quality guns.

2C) 1911's. We addressed the older milsurp type 1911's already, as to the rest. At the risk of offending somebody here is my observation on 1911's. Two types of 1911's actually work reliably. The first are basic Mil Spec type guns from quality manufacturers specifically Springfield and Colt. These guns will shoot all day long with the accuracy you would expect from a service weapon (good but not amazing). The second are really high end custom guns like Ed Brown and Wilson Combat or the high end Colt's. These guns work well but they cost as much as a decent used car. Probably outside most peoples budget for a carry gun. If you can afford it without shorting yourself elsewhere then rock on.

The problems with 1911's come, in my not so humble opinion, from fly by night custom 'Bob's Mom's basement' makers and lower end "target guns". Bob sucks as an armorer and certainly is not a craftsmen. He slaps together a bunch of different brand parts without a clue what he is doing. There are issues with fitting and stacking tolerances. As to the lower end "target guns". Modern manufacturing technology makes it easy to crank down tolerances which makes guns more accurate but at the expense of reliability. Tight tolerances without serious quality control and craftsmen level fitting make for an unreliable gun. There is a reason AK's and those old WWII 1911's (with ball ammo they are designed for) will run all day long dirty as can be, they have fairly loose tolerances.

3) Good on this guy for actually testing his gun with the defensive ammunition he carries. I think far too few people actually do this and it is important. We could debate round count here. I've seen some folks say you need to shoot 500 rounds of carry ammo to know it is reliable. Honestly I am not doing that unless someone else foots the bill. Typically I shoot about 50 rounds. Since the only centerfire semi automatic pistols we own are Glock's there are never any issues, this is just a check.

4) To support #2 I do not carry super expensive all brass hollow points like the new Cor Bon stuff. I carry 115gr JHP Federal Classic Personal Defense. Awhile back I got a case of the stuff from Lucky Gunner for like .35 cents a round. They have it in stock now but given the state of things prices are considerably higher. They will come back down in due time at which point I will buy another case.

5) I am strongly against any home gunsmith work (not to be confused with basic armorer tasks like swapping out a simple drop in part) on defensive weapons unless you have some training and genuinely know what you are doing. By all means explore and try new things. Just do it with plinking/ fun, hunting or sporting guns. If your home repair/ work on a clay shooting shotgun or deer rifle fails worst case your day at the range or hunt is ruined. In the grand scheme of things neither of those are a huge deal. On the other hand if defensive weapons fail you and your family could end up dead.

This means either buy guns that work reliably which can be repaired using drop in parts (the way to go) or if that does not work or the problem is too serious take your defensive weapons to a legitimate gunsmith who is competent, or even specializes, in that particular weapon.

6. In conclusion- Buy modern professional grade guns for defensive use. If they break take them to a legitimate gunsmith to be fixed.


Monday, May 13, 2013

Successes and Failures: My Week in Preparation

Some stuff went well this week. Dug into my ruck, inventorying and updating some stuff. Also reorganized my food into 1 day bags (x3) confirming there are enough calories in each one. Would like to add a little bit more as well as some of those little drink packets. Of course now I need to do the same for another bag or two.

After some consideration I am going to take a couple things out of my bag to lighten it up, well really to make room for other stuff. Another part of that is just shifting from winter stuff to summer stuff. Did a little work on the second bag making a mental inventory of what is needed to finish it. That all went well.

There was a deal on the table for a Glock 26. The dude flaked out for whatever reason. These thing do happen for a variety of reasons in private sales. However it was disappointing all the same. I'll end up with one eventually.

Had planned to make spaghetti sauce from a bunch of tomatoes then can it. The sauce didn't turn out right. I'm not sure where things went wrong but instead of spaghetti sauce it ended up as a giant pan of nasty lumpy tomatoes. Tasked like #*$)# to boot. So after wasting several hours the whole mess went into the trash. At least I didn't put a bunch of money into the food that did not turn out.

Still digesting that whole experience but I did learn some things. Was too focused on the preserving side and not enough on the cooking side. Probably need to really figure out some (canning compatible) recipes then worry about the preserving side. Or maybe just do a few easier things like jam, maybe both plans. Also we probably need another big pot.

So a few things happened this week. Some succeeded while others failed. While nobody likes failure it does almost inevitably come with branching out to doing new things. If I have something approaching a cohesive point here it is that skills take time to develop. There will be growing pains and you will find little pieces of this and that which are needed to pull it off. Bottom line in my opinion it is unlikely you will all of a sudden be able to execute new and unfamiliar skill important sets in a high stress environment. So get to learning and making mistakes NOW.

Monday, May 6, 2013

Jack Asks Glock 26 or 19?

My recent discussion of the J frame received a comment on our general discussion of the Glock 26 I wanted to reply to here.

@ Grasshoppa and Ryan,
I'm currently looking at an in between from an LCP, my little pocket rocket and my FN 40. I've decided at this point, I want to go 9mm for capacity and more power than a .380. Right now I've thought of the G19 but have recently been playing with the idea of a G26. Either way I carry one back up mag so the difference from 25 to 30 rounds isn't a biggie. If it works out, and the wifey likes it, which I'm almost sure she will since she loves my dads SR9c, I'd get her one down the road. Anyway what are your thoughts from your G26 and 19, respectively? Personal preferences, wish you woulda gone the other way first? I'll probably get both down the road but that could easily be years. Also, taking my current set up in mind, I've got a pocket rocket and a full size what would you suggest? Thanks for your time and help!!! Much appreciated!


 Jack, If you had said "I'm looking to get my first handgun. It's narrowed down to a Glock 26 or a Glock 19, which should I get?" or "I can only take 1 pistol on our upcoming road/ boat/ whatever trip; should it be the Glock 26 or Glock 19?" the answer would be simple. Glock 19 every day of the week plus twice on Sunday. However your question is a bit more complicated. First you already have a full sized pistol and a tiny gun. Second we get into concept of use.

I love the Glock 19. It is a great compromise of shootability, concealment and round count in a sufficiently potent cartridge for 2 legged predators. On the other hand like any compromise there are some sacrifices at the extreme ends.

When I was a kid in Scouts and such we camped a lot at least 1-2x a month year round. Money was relatively tight for most of us. We couldn't afford to have sets of summer, spring/fall and winter tents/ sleeping bags/ etc. That meant we had to make choices. Gear that was ready for January in the mountains out of the box was a real drag the rest of the time. On the other hand super light summer stuff wouldn't work for half of the year. The answer was to split the middle and get what I would call 3 season gear. In the summer it is easy enough to sleep with a bag open. In the winter you slap a tarp over the tent then add a fleece or wool (depending on the situation) blanket with the sleeping bag and you were good to go. Wasn't perfect but it worked pretty well.

To answer your question we have to get into concept of use. For a gun that will do house duty, concealed carry and potential SHTF type duty I would go with the Glock 19. After selling off a couple other pistols it has became my do everything handgun. For this concept of use I prefer the Glock 19. On the other hand if I wanted the commonality and reliability of a Glock 9mm in a package that was comfortable to carry to the store for popsycles on the hottest August day and already had a larger handgun for other purposes the Glock 26 would probably be the way to go. So my answer would be no I would not do it the other way around. Granted if I had it to do over again, knowing I would later want a Glock 26 when  they are unobtanium at sane prices, might have done some things different so it would be in the safe now but not instead of a G19. In any case there is usually another gun you really wish you could've bought.

[Along those lines I've came to terms with the fact that I'm not getting a G26 any time soon. When they are showing up prices are well above $600 with $650 being pretty common. Simply not willing to pay that silly of a price for something I do not NEED. Availability will come back sooner or later then I will purchase a gently used Glock 26 for a reasonable price. Kinda lame but oh well.]

For your situation. It seems to me like you are looking for a larger more potent gun that YOU WILL CARRY on those hot summer days to the corner store. I fear for that concept of use a Glock 19 will lose out to your LCP almost every time which misses the point of buying it. There is a distinct possibility it will sit by the FN in the safe. On the other hand a Glock 26 will probably make it out the door a good percentage of the time.

So those are my thoughts on that. As always input is appreciated.

Saturday, May 4, 2013

Glock 3.5lb Connector Installation

Today I put a 3.5lb connector in my EDC Glock. Also put in a stainless steel guide rod. Don't remember who made them but these parts are pretty standard so it doesn't matter too much.

Here is the video I used to do it.

Granted it's possible to do this with a reference book (which you should have for a backup) but videos tend to work better. 

This combo is pretty awesome. Really it's becoming standard for me. The cost is around $40 once you figure in shipping so it's an easy decision to make. Night sights are also excellent but cost a bit more in the range of $100. I can use another set of those.

Anyway I wanted to share that all with you.

Saturday, April 27, 2013

Gun Show Report 4/27/13

Turns out our little town had a gunshow today! So needless to say I had to check it out. As I'm in the market for a Glock 26 it made sense to go look. It was interesting for sure. Aside from the baby Glock I wasn't really looking for anything but was open to a great deal or something small to fill a need.

Guns: Tons of AR's, AK's, SKS's and Mini 14's. A good variety of semi auto .308's; M1A's and PTR-91's, a FAL n a solitary genuine HK G3 (semi). Older guns like Garands and M1 carbines were present as well as lots of hunting type rifles. Plenty of semi auto pistols like XD's, M&P's, Sigs, Glocks, etc though due to the sheer variety in that market the specific gun you want (in my case a Glock 26) might not have been be present. As to Glocks there were at least 1 each 17 and 19, a few various .45's and a couple G27's.Shotguns and .22's were also present in large numbers.

Prices varied widely. Some politically incorrect guns (mostly AR's n AK's) were priced OK considering the state of things. A couple AR's were at or around a grand. They were DMPS, the basic M&P's or comparable brands. Saw 2 nice new (dealer) rifles (BCM and Stag) for $1,150ish. Other rifles varied from optimistically priced to just silly. Several AR's from brands I have never heard of were listed at $1,600-1,700. AK's ran from $1,200 Norico Mac-90's to a $850 WASR. SKS's were running $500ish. M1A's were $2,200-2,500 and PTR's were 1,200-1,400.

Hunting rifles, shotguns and .22's were a little high but if you consider that bargaining is a given part of it's probably their padding. Ruger 10/22's were consistently priced at $325.

Pistol prices were consistently 50-100 higher than they should be. Glocks were 550-600. A guy was trying to get $850 for XDm's and another wanted $800 for a Jerico (IMI the same gun as the Baby Eagle I think) in 9mm. Revolvers were priced pretty optomistically also.

Mags: Lots of mags available. Big stacks of various AR mags and a decent speckling of PMAGs. Sig and Glock mags were present as well as some Glock 33rd 'happy sticks'. A lot of AK mags also. A speckling of less common rifle mags like Mini-14, M1 carbine, SKS detachable mags (d model?), HK G3, FN-FAL. Probably 2 dozen Ruger BX-25's and a dozen various off brand 10/22 25rd type mags. Several old guys with stacks of used mags for just about every gun made in the last 50 years.

Mag prices: USGI used AR mags $20, new aftermarket type (Brownells, Lancer, etc) AR mags $25, PMAGs $35 which is odd because a shop in town has a bunch @$21-22. Those big 60 rd surefire mags from $160-200. AK steel presumably surplus $25 except a solitary mag @$45. BXP's $60-80. Glock mags $35-40, HK G3 mags $20-25 and they were pretty rough. Those are all the prices I remember but they generally fit the same relative price point as the ones I paid attention to.

I saw 2 CMMG .22 conversion mags for the first time in awhile. Wanted to buy them but didn't see the .22 conversion kit sitting nearby and justifiably the guy would not sell them without the kit. He of course tried to sell me an AR to go with the kit I didn't want to buy (wanted the mags) then we ended up talking. He wanted my opinion of the kit. I said without changing my rifles sights it offered sufficient practical accuracy out to at least 25 meters to train or I suppose shoot small game. Told him that was sufficient for my needs and I am happy with the kit.

Ammo: This was just silly. The big local shop had a table selling .223 (PMC X-tac 55gr) around $11/20 with a 2 box limit. They had a bit of pistol ammo but I think it was for folks buying guns. Everybody else pretty much lost their damn minds. 9mm 25+/50 for brass FMJ's. .40 and .45 were more like $30/50 brass FMJ. .223 at 17/20 at one booth with the rest at a buck a round (for various low end range type ammo). 7.62x39 from $9/20-$11/20. .308 was at least a buck a round. A solitary spam can of 7.62x54R for $140, surplus 30'06 was a buck a round. Surprisingly shotgun ammo was pretty expensive also. The dudes selling .22 ammo must have been smoking a special type of crack that breeds optimism. Bricks (500-550) of bulk type .22 lr were on tables varying from $80-120. Saw the little 50 round boxes of CCI Mini Mag for $30.

One dealer in particular seemed to have utterly lost their minds. They were trying to get $40 for standard (Federal or Remington, I don't remember) 20 round boxes of 150gr soft points and $179 for a brick of federal .22lr. They had ammo cans (albeit the plastic with rubber seals) at a decent price but out of principle I did not buy any.

Discussion: Loaded guns were not allowed inside. Some guy cleared my Glock 19 for me into a makeshift (think it was a 5 gallon bucket of sand but it faced a cement wall) barrel then it was zip tied, marked with a white sticker and returned to me. Not sure how I feel about that but considering folks have been shooting each other fiddling with guns inside or busting caps all over the place trying to clear their guns on the way in it makes sense.

Now that we have talked about what folks were TRYING TO SELL it makes sense to talk about what was actually being sold. Semi automatic pistols were moving. I was driving around trying to find the place and saw a dude walking down the street with a pistol in his hand (think it had a tag on it) and asked him if it was the gun show to which he relied that it was. People were looking at handguns then some of them were buying. Hunting rifles and shotguns priced right were moving. Various collector type stuff as well as little odds n ends (holsters, etc) were getting picked over, examined, bargained over and occasionally purchased.

As to mags they weren't going anywhere. Didn't see a single AR/ AK/ G-3 mag sold nor any common pistol mags like Glock/ Sig/ XD/ etc. Saw one guy getting Mini-14 mags plus a few people looking for a spare mag for their hunting rifle, .22 plinker or an oddball (50's era .380, etc) pistol mag.

Plenty of people seemed to be looking at ammo but few were buying.  At the prices I saw it is hard to blame them. One dude really wanted .22 but not at the prices being asked. A couple folks picked up 1-2 boxes of .223, a couple got a box or two of pistol or shotgun ammo and a few folks wanted a box for various hunting type rifles. Nobody was picking up arm fulls of the stuff.

Some individuals were selling doing the walk around with a sign on their chest thing. Most had the usual odd mixture of a 40 year old .22, a 1911 and whatever. One dude had an FN-AR .308 which was pretty cool, didn't even ask the price. A dealer I asked about G26's tried to buy my Glock 19.

Personally I bought a book and 3 of those little plastic AR muzzle caps. Stickers said 12 to which I offered 10 which was accepted.  Looked at lots of guns, handled a few, laughed at some ammo prices, chatted with some nice people and generally had a fine time. Would have liked to leave with a Glock 26 but it wasn't a bad way to waste a couple hours.

How does this compare with your neighborhood?

Friday, April 26, 2013

Glock 26 Thoughts...

This afternoon I went out to the local gun shop to fiddle with a baby Glock. I liked that little thing. Chief Instructor's note that the magazine extension is a must are definitely valid. It's officially on the short list. However since I'm not willing to pay retail, let alone retail plus, for a used pistol it might take a little while to find one. That's fine though.

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Baby Glocks?

As it gets hot here packing the G19, other than open carry, isn't getting any easier. Do have a valid option in the J frame but the capacity and reload situation there is not so great. A better option that will be easier to conceal than the G19 would be nice to have on inventory. A Glock 26 came into my head as an option. A bit thick for such a small gun but it holds a lot of bullets for it's size plus the mags/ parts/ ammo are already on inventory.

If you own or have owned a Glock 26 I am interested in your thoughts. Thanks,

Thursday, March 14, 2013

Spring Carry and Gardening

The weather here in Southern Arizona seems to have decided to stop snowing and that it's Spring. A pleasant change but pretty fast. Suppose that's the nature of the desert. This brings up a couple issues worth discussing.

Carrying a gun in the fall and winter is easy. Pack whatever you want then put on a coat. It's the good times for sure. The benefits of packing a full sized piece without any of the issues of concealment. Spring and summer are what separates those who practice high percentage/ consistent carry from the fair weather strap on a heater in the winter or when they are going to wherever and want to pose.

Warm weather carry is not hard with a bit of planning. Get an inside the waistband (IWB) holster and get started. Blackhawk makes a decent one at a great price. You can choose to carry a compact pistol like a Glock 19 or subcompact pistol like a baby Glock or J frame which makes things easier. While I do not like following the rabbit hole of smaller guns down to a really small gun like a Beretta 21A/ NAA .22 revolver, etc but  they certainly beat not having a gun at all. On the other side of the coin you can dress around a bigger gun (though most won't and it will stay in the glove box/ nightstand/ safe) or open carry.

The endstate is to not let the weather getting warmer stop you from carrying.

The garden is coming along pretty well. The green onions from the store definitely sprouted in the cup of water. Turns out the roots need space below them and once I lifted them off the bottom of the cup they went crazy.  Now they are sitting in a pot of dirt. The potatoes (also from the store) are sort of going. They definitely have white shoots coming from the original taters and a couple are growing some leaves. I am optomistic that the rest will catch up. Hopefully they will get to growing and in a week or so I'll put them into a container.

The garden is coming along. So far I am really enjoying it and find the whole thing quite calming. Maybe I will try to do a second wave of stuff and or try to grow some more herbs.

Sunday, March 10, 2013

Basic Budget Guns Part 2: Handguns

To continue the ongoing series (Part 1, Part 1.5, Part 1.75) today we will talk about handguns. To catch you up I recommend buying common model firearms from reputable and common manufacturers chambered in a common caliber. Also remember to consider the cost of fully equipping them when comparing and pricing guns.

The goal here is to get a basic gun that fits a tight budget but is still a good solid weapon to bet your life on. The distinction between this and the cheapest guns out there is significant.

While I do not have a clear price range in mind a loose goal of $350 (of course markets vary so these guns might be 4 and a quarter in LA or 300ish in Alabama) to $400 seems like a good mark. This is of course for the gun itself, though if you buy used a holster (and maybe extra mag) might get tossed into the deal.

For a one handgun solution I tend to favor compact pistols. A .38/.357mag *3 inch* J(small) or 3-4" K(medium) sized revolver is a really good option. I would recommend Smith and Wesson or Ruger or if those are not available a fairly new Taurus. Unless you know what you are doing (which is not the target audience of this series) an older Charter Arms, Rossi, Taurus, etc might very well be a lemon and only useful as a paperweight. Newer Smiths run out of this price range in a hurry but an older revolver like a Model 10 or 64 can be had in this price range. Rugers do pop up here also. Both will probably run a bit closer to $400 but they do not need mags.

The reason revolvers will come in the cheapest is because you do not need mags. Figuring $25-35 for most mags (not today, we'll get to that in a minute) and that IMO you want a bare minimum of 6 mags cost adds up fast.

For semi auto's the Kel Tech PF9 and Ruger LC 9 both seem like pretty decent contenders and are in our price range. They are towards the smaller end of guns I would be comfortable with for an everything handgun but they are readily available and take single stack mags which are still out there at sane prices. The really little .380's and 2" J frames are difficult guns to shoot well and not especially fun to shoot which means you are less likely to put in the time to learn to use them. This combination makes them less than ideal beginner guns.

Interestingly Iraq Vet8888/ Barry of Moss Gun and Pawn did a video on handguns under $350.

Won't disagree with anything they said but there are inherent compromises in basic budge guns. Compromises that are acceptable for one person might not be acceptable for another. If you are a bit less concerned about commonality of ammunition and parts the Bersa .380 is worth looking into. If you plan to buy all the ammo and parts you will every need with the gun then the Makarov is a fine option.

Note that I really haven't talked about  any double stack auto's. Glock pistols and in particular the Glock 19 (which would otherwise be my choice here) are relatively hard to find these days. You can get them but (excluding oddballs like .45GAP) they are running a bit more expensive than before firearmagedon. In my neck of the woods it will be very hard to touch a non oddball used Glock for under $550 with $600 probably being average. Most significantly the price of full capacity double stack mags that hold more than 10 rounds (especially Glock 9's)  is up considerably, though they are slowly trending down. Glock mags are running $43-45 in my neck of the woods and it's a sellers market. This is significantly up from the $25-28 pre panic prices. For a guy like me who wants to have 9-10 mags that is a big price difference. Between the higher price of the gun and mags I think the Glock 9mm is currently priced out of a "common man" budget. The same can be said for the other pistols that would normally be in this range. Smith and Wesson Sigma's and the old Ruger P series still offer good value if you can find mags at a sane price.

My basic budget handgun setup would be:
-handgun (duh)
-6 magazines for an auto/ some speedloaders for a revolver
-500 rounds of ammunition. In a perfect world you might have 500 rounds of JHP ammo and then some FMJ for plinking but if the budget is tight consider getting 100 rounds of JHP and the rest FMJ. If the budget is uuber tight just rock boring old ball ammo.
-decent holster that can be used for concealment
-belt stuff enough to comfortably hold said gun in holster

Personally I would be looking for a decent used revolver either a Smith and Wesson Model 10/64 .38 or a Ruger Security 6 .357 really whichever came up first.

Hope that helps somebody. Next chapter we will talk shotguns which will be short and easy.

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